Posts Tagged ‘instantphotos’

Hacking a Rolleiflex TLR to Shoot Fujifilm Instax Instant Photos

rolleiinstax

Here’s an interesting fusion of analog camera technologies: Kevin over at the Hong Kong-based photo site FilMe figured out how to make his Rolleiflex twin-lens reflex camera shoot Fujifilm Instax instant photos.
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Surreal Composites Created by Arranging Individual Instant Photos

Since 2006, Brooklyn-based artist Patrick Winfield has been creating incredible photo collages by photographing and recreating scenes using a large number of individual instant photo prints. Some of his pieces are composed by more than over one hundred instant photos! Although his work mostly featured Polaroid films early on, Winfield branched out into other types as well (e.g. The Impossible Project instant films) after Polaroid bowed out of the industry.
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Watch the Impossible Instant Lab Turn an iPhone Portrait into a Polaroid Picture

At The Impossible Project’s booth at Photokina 2012, there was a Impossible Instant Lab camera printer/camera being demonstrated. This is the device that was announced a couple of weeks ago that lets you quickly turn your iPhone photos into Polaroid pictures (i.e. Impossible’s instant film or whatever stock you have left).
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Impossible Instant Lab Turns Your iPhone Photos Into Real Polaroid Pictures

Now that The Impossible Project has succeeded in reviving Polaroid-style instant films — even giant ones — the company is expanding its horizons and branching out to new products. Today, it announced a crazy new device that’s dedicated to turning your digital iPhone photos into analog instant photo prints: the Impossible Instant Lab.
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Nigo: Limited Edition Instant Film with Colorful Frames

The Impossible Project has partnered up with Japanese music producer and designer Nigo for a limited edition version of its PX 70 Color Shade Film. Instead of its traditional white frames or the newer black frames, the film comes in 10 different colors: yellow, orange, red, pink, lilac, dark blue, light blue, green, black and white. Each pack comes with eight frames with randomly selected colors and costs $25 over at The Impossible Project shop.

PX 70 Color Shade by Nigo Film Edition [Impossible Project]

Portraits of Afghan Villagers with Instant Pictures of Themselves

After reading about the Wakhan Corridor in the New York Times, French photographers Fabrice Nadjari and Cedric Houin decided to visit the remote region in Afghanistan in the summer of 2011, walking for 24 days through a 140 mile stretch. Their project, titled “Traces of Time”, involved capturing instant photos of the villagers they met:

When [Nadjari and Houin] arrived in the first village, they found that even photographs, which freeze time, worked differently. The portraits they took with Polaroid cameras developed oddly, and degraded rapidly, because of the high altitude and harsh conditions. But this made them no less valuable to their subjects, many of whom had never seen a photograph. Some had never seen an outsider.

The local Afghans marveled at the fragile images and lined up to have their photos taken.

“There was something extremely precious in the way they were holding the image, in the way they wanted to get it as soon as it got out of the camera,” Mr. Nadjari said. “It was both the gift and the interaction.” [#]

The photographers soon decided that they would shoot portraits of the villagers holding their own portraits, with the instant photos seen in color while the rest of the portrait is converted to monochrome, saying that it “stops time, and mixes the past and present. The present looks like the past, and the past like the present.”

A Hard Trek to Humility (via Photojojo)


Image credits: Photographs by Fabrice Nadjari and Cedric Houin

Turn Your Old Digital Photos into Faux Instax Prints

Eve Johnson of Evalicious wanted to turn some old digital photographs into Instax-style prints for a travel journal, so she decided to make some fake ones. She arranged two photos on each template, saved them as 4×6 prints, had them made at a local print shop, and then cut them out in Instax dimensions. You can find the low down over on her blog.

faux instax: how to [shopEvalicious]

DIY Instant Photo Display Made From a Wood Lattice and Clothespins

Talia van der Wel of New Zealand wanted a simple and beautiful way to display instant photos, and came up with the idea of an empty frame in which photos are hung on clothespins from twine. After sharing the idea with her husband, he went and created the frame out of an old wood lattice.
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Photographing Native Mongolians Who Had Never Seen a Photo of Themselves

Teenage photographers Vanessa Hollander and Wilson Philippe embarked on a ten-day motorcycle trip across Mongolia this past summer on a mission to give instant photo portraits to Native Mongolians who had never seen a photo before. They also made the above video documenting the reactions of a few of their subjects:

each person photographed really prized and protected his or her polaroid (fearing that we wanted to keep it), and barely let us see it when it was developed! the children automatically stored it away once we showed them what was the very first picture of themselves. it was a really great and humbling experience and showed us how much just one photograph can mean to people who have never had one of themselves. although many people claim they want to escape this mess of technology in more delevoped countries, we often tend to take the beauty of some technology, such as photography, for granted. [#]

Unless you’re a photography-hating robot, the video should bring a smile to your face and a fuzzy feeling to your heart.

mongolia! (via Photojojo)

Use Your Coffee Table to Show Off Your Photographs

File this under “awesome ways to show off your photos”. Lomographer zakguy had a year’s worth of Instax Mini instant photos on his hands and no way to display them, so he created a custom coffee table using his favorite shots!

I arranged my favorite shots into a pattern based on overall photo color. It isn’t perfect, but it makes for a really fun real life Lomowall, but on a coffee table. From there we carefully taped down the photos squarely to the table with double sided tape to hold them all in place. Once they were all in place, I went to a local hardware store (Lowe’s) and had them cut a piece of thick plexiglass to cover the table top exactly. I attached some adhesive rubber bumpers to each of the 4 corners and placed it on top of the photos, and that was it. [#]

It’s a neat DIY project that you can do yourself if you have a suitable coffee table and a collection of prints you want to display.

(via Lomography)


Image credit: Photograph by zakguy