Posts Tagged ‘color’

Amazing Night Vision Cam Captures Full Color HD Instead of the Classic Green

When we say ‘night vision’ camera, what sort of image does that bring to mind? Probably something green, or maybe grey if you’re into IR, but definitely not 720p footage shot in full color. Well, that may change soon if the newly announced Falcon Eye KC-2000 night vision camera delivers on its promises. Read more…

Kapsones Custom Lens Hoods Can Give Your Gear Some Colorful Flair

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Want to give your plain-looking camera a dash of color? Kapsones can help you do that. It’s a new line of custom lens hoods — the company describes them as “jewelry for your camera” — that launched recently over in Eindhoven, Netherlands.
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This Image Shows Every Color of Visible Light Emitted by the Sun

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If you paid attention in high-school physics, you know that white light contains within it the rainbow of colors of the visible light spectrum: red, orange, yellow, green, blue and violet (and if you’re Isaac Newton you throw Indigo in there for good measure).

Sunlight, however, is a little more complicated. And so, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory has put together a high-resolution image that shows just how much of each color is contained in the light coming from that star that keeps us all alive. Read more…

These Photos Contain Exactly One Pixel of Each of the 16 Million RGB Colors

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For you and me, RGB color spaces may just be an obscure but important mechanism towards achieving properly color-balanced photos. For a certain group of image nerds, however, it’s the whole enchilada. Read more…

Color in Filmmaking: From the First Color Photograph to Digital Color Manipulation

Long before there was any way to capture colors on film, filmmakers were hand painting their short movies frame by frame to breathe life into black-and-white productions. The desire to capture color, it seems, far precedes our ability to do so.

In the Filmmaker IQ video above, John Hess takes you through a comprehensive history of color in filmmaking. From hand-tinting, to Technicolor, to digital color manipulation, take a look and see just how far we’ve come when it comes to capturing the reds, greens and blues of our world. Read more…

Pixy: A Low Cost Camera that Recognizes and Follows Objects by Color

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Camera technology is always being used/tweaked in one way or another to yield surprising or novel results. In some cases, that means creating a camera that sees like a bug’s eye. In others, one that perceives only motion, like a retina.

The most recent camera innovation we’ve stumble across falls a bit closer to the second of those. It’s called Pixy, and it’s a color-detecting camera that might some day soon be the eye with which your friendly neighborhood robot sees and interprets the world. Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Colorizing Photoshoppers Put a New Spin on Old Historical Photos

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There’s an awesome little subreddit that has been getting a lot of press coverage as of late. It’s called ColorizedHistory, and is a 20,000+ person strong community of “Amateur Historians” who are interested in the idea of creating high quality colorized versions of historical black-and-white photographs.
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Amazing Color Footage of Britain from the 1920s

About a month ago, we shared some stunning footage that showed what London was like all the way back in 1926. The original filming was done by Claude Friese-Greene, whose father William invented the ‘Biocolour‘ technique of capturing color film footage.

That particular video was a compilation of snippets that Friese-Greene had filmed in London when he returned form a 2-year journey. He called the final product The Open Road, and it was a 26-part series that took him all over Britain. Fortunately for us, much of it has now been digitized and uploaded bit-by-bit to YouTube by The BFI National Archive. Read more…

Blast From the Past: High Quality Color Footage of New York City in the 1930s

Color film first burst onto the scene in 1935 when Kodak introduced the world to Kodachrome, and the first of this film that was available to the public was the 16mm variety for home movies. Later, Kodak introduced similar 8mm and 35mm film for home movies and photography, respectively, but it was the 16mm film that had finally offered consumers the ability to easily capture their world in color for the very first time.

The above video is a rare clip released by the Romano Archives that shows what French tourist Jean Vivier was able to capture using the 16mm film all the way back in 1939, when he came to visit the Big Apple. Read more…

BTS: Chase Jarvis Literally Gets to Make His Dream a Reality for a Samsung Ad

Photographer Chase Jarvis has a recurring dream in which he is floating in a sea of vividly colored clouds (don’t we all?). So when Samsung came to him with a bunch of money and instructions to do whatever he wanted just as long as it highlighted the color capabilities of the company’s Series 9 monitors, he decided to make his dreams come true — literally.

His only demand from Samsung was that the company let him create an epic behind the scenes video that showed how his team brought the whole thing together. Read more…