Posts Tagged ‘blastfromthepast’

A Brief History of Gear: Here is a Collection of Camera Commercials from the Past 20 Years

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Here’s a collection of camera commercials that have appeared over the past 20 years. No matter your age, there’s probably something here that you’ll remember, and I hope it will bring back a bit of nostalgia. I’ve also selected what I consider the best commercial of them all.
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America’s First Female Photojournalist, Jessie Tarbox Beals, With Her Cameras

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Here’s a photograph of Jessie Tarbox Beals, America’s first female photojournalist, with her camera on a street a century ago. While most female photographers of her time shot photos from the peace and safety of photo studios, Beals ventured into the world of photojournalism and made a name for herself through her tenacity, self-promotion, and freelance news photos.
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A Blast from the Past: Demos of Adobe Photoshop 1.0

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Adobe celebrated Photoshop’s 25th birthday yesterday with great fanfare. Since the original Photoshop version 1.0 was launched back on February 19th, 1990, there have been 15 major versions released that have advanced the way we work with (and look at) photographs.

To see how far post-processing has come over the past two-and-a-half decades, here’s a closer look at what it was like to use the very first version of Photoshop.
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A Blast from the Past: How the World of Photography Was Changing Back in 1887

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Back in 1887, a photography instructor named Edward M. Estabrooke published a book titled Photography in the Studio and in the Field. It was “a practical manual designed as a companion alike to the professional and the amateur photographer.”

Filled with detailed information on how to practice photography with the equipment and technologies of the time, the book also contains interesting passages that describe how the world of photography was changing.
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Daughter Creatively Inserts Herself Into Her Mother’s Childhood Photos

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Portland-based Art Director Danielle Delph says she often wonders if her mother and her would have been friends if they had grown up together. And while that question can’t be answered in a literal sense (yet… not giving up hope on a time-machine just yet), Delph put her impressive Photoshop skills to use answering it metaphorically. Read more…

It Would Take 21 of These IBM Hard Drives from 1956 to Hold a Single D800 RAW File

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Here’s both a neat picture and a mind-blowing fact for you. What you see above is the IBM Model 350 Disk File from 1956. It weighed over a ton, contained fifty 24-inch disks, and was leased to companies for $3,200 per month. It could hold… 3.75 Megabytes.

That means that it would take 21 of these puppies to hold the largest 14-bit RAW file the Nikon D800 spits out. Read more…

Blast from the Past: Kodak Ad from 2006 Said Kodak Would Take Over the Digital Revolution

In the funny-but-also-sad ad from 2006, Kodak sought to convince the world that it was ready to move to the forefront of the digital revolution that it had given birth to and then ignored for so long. You know… the same one that ended up forcing the company to declare bankruptcy a little more than half a decade later. Read more…

Blast from the Past: The Daily Show Slams Camera Phones as a Useless Combination

In 2004, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart took on a burgeoning technology that they saw as a completely nonsensical mix of two things: the camera phone. As Ed Helms puts it in the “digital watch” segment above, the technology “combines the rapid battery depletion of a high-powered digital camera with the image production capability of a phone.” Read more…

Captivating Video: Footage of 1924 London Overlaid Onto Footage of 2014 London

We’ve shared his work before here on PetaPixel, but this time filmmaker Simon Smith has stepped up his game.

Whereas his previous collaboration compared 1920s footage of London to footage he captured present day side-by-side, his newest then-and-now piece overlays the two, creating a throwback to the London of 1924 by placing the scenes inside of modern-day London. Read more…

Fascinating Film from 1939 Looks Back at the First Hundred Years of Photography

In 1939, British Pathé — whose fascinating photography-related old videos we’ve shared before — covered something truly amazing: 100 years of photography. It had been 100 years since the camera was invented and so, they took a look back at how those years had changed and refined the art of capturing images using a light-tight box and whatever light-sensitive material you happen to have at hand.

The video really does earn the term ‘fascinating,’ but beyond condensing some great educational tidbits into just a couple of minutes, it also makes you wonder at what 2036’s look back will show. There are already so many wonders we have to celebrate at the 175-year mark, how many more do the next 25 years hold?

(via Reddit)