Posts Tagged ‘blastfromthepast’

Video Shows Off Awesome Franken-Kodak DSLR Aboard 1991 Space Shuttle

It’s #throwbackthursday, right? Good, because we have a rather interesting piece of photography history to share with you, courtesy of NASA, Nikon and Kodak. Read more…

Blast from the Past: Photography ‘Holiday Camp’ Video from 1961

This is pretty cool, and might just give you a good laugh at the same time. Go back in time and see what a photography ‘holiday camp’ (read: photography workshop) was like back in 1961, as what look to be a bunch of very amateur photographers try and learn to better compose and set up shots of beautiful women. Read more…

The Think Camera: Old Leica M4 Ad Brags About the Camera’s Lack of Technology

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There’s something awesome about vintage ads. This rings especially true for photography ads, because while technology ads of the past for things like computers or other gadgets might seem comically archaic, the text in something like this Leica M4 ad could very well be seen in the next Pure Photography-like campaign. Read more…

Blast from the Past: 1965 Pentax Spotmatic Review

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Photography has a rich history that is really fun to peer back into once in a while when you have a spare minute to stop oogling over the next piece of gear (*cough* NEX full-frame *cough*) that’ll steal your heart and most of the funds in your bank account.

On that note, check out this awesome old review of the Pentax Spotmatic. It was written in 1965 by the late Fred Springer-Miller, and it might make you think twice before you take today’s technology for granted. Read more…

Blast from the Past: Vintage Commercial for the Nimslo 35mm 3D Camera

Sure, the 1980s isn’t quite so far in the past as, say, the first photo, but the commercial above is classic nonetheless. It shows off the Nimslo 35mm 3D camera, the first consumer level 3D lenticular camera of the 80s and, if you believe the commercial, “the most important new camera of your lifetime.” Read more…

Blast From The Past: Classic Commercial for the Polaroid SX-70 Land Camera

One month ago today, the Polaroid SX-70 Land Camera — a camera that TIME’s own Harry McCracken called “the greatest gadget of all time” — celebrated its 41st birthday. When it came out it was absolutely revolutionary, and to get the word out, Polaroid put together a few ads to show off the instant shooter. Read more…

Blast from the Past: Kodak’s Autographic Cameras Let You Sign Your Negatives

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You might not know this, but there was metadata before there was, well, metadata. Way back in 1914, Kodak introduced the Autographic system, a combination of autographic cameras and film that allowed you to permanently sign, date and title your negatives as you shot them. Read more…

Blast From the Past: Take a Trip on New York City’s Subway System Circa 1905

In the past, we’ve had occasion to share some great color film footage that showed London and the UK as a whole all the way back in the 1920s. We’ve even shown you some stateside footage shot by a French tourist in the 1930s.

The latest bit of historical footage we’ve come across isn’t in color (unfortunately), but it does show a New York City staple right after it was first built: The New York City Subway System. Read more…

How They Sent Photos Across the Ocean Back in 1926

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These days, it’s easy to take for granted what the magic of the Internet, wireless technology and fiber optic cables has made possible, but there was a time when sending a photograph a long distance in a short time wasn’t quite that easy.

For instance, in 1926, someone on an oceanliner called the S.S. President Roosevelt snapped the above photo of the S.S. Antinoe during a rescue attempt. When that photo was sent almost instantly from London to New York City, it was such a big deal that the April 1926 issue of Science and Invention printed a huge infographic to show its readers how this miracle was achieved. Read more…

Did You Know: TIME Magazine Once Gave Away Free 35mm Cameras to Subscribers

Back in 1985, TIME magazine was determined to get more subscribers. We know this because of the special TV offer you see above. If you happen to be around when this commercial aired, all you needed to do was call the number to get a TIME magazine subscription for 40% off, and a free 35mm camera! Read more…