Posts Published in August 2012

Behind the Scenes with an Underwater Photog Shooting Billfish and Sharks

Photographing apex predators on land is one thing, but do it in the ocean and it’s an entirely different ball game. This behind-the-scenes video follows underwater photographer Marc Montocchio of 36North on a trip he took to the island of Saint Thomas in the US Virgin Islands. His goal was to capture a photograph of a free swimming blue marlin, which required the fishermen helping him to “fish” with a lure and no hook.
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Surreal Photos of Twisty Ladders on a Misty Beach

One way to shoot surreal photographs is to capture things where they don’t ordinarily belong, whether it’s glowing cubes in a forest or houses and babies floating in mid-air. Often this type of image is done using photo manipulation, but that’s not true of the photos in artist Joy Umali’s project titled Ladders. Umali hauled a number of distorted metal ladders onto Rodeo Beach in San Francisco, and then had photographer Walter Kitundu photograph the scene.
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Man’s Instagram Photo of NYC Shooting Victim Sparks Media Frenzy, Controversy

Just a few hours ago, a man opened fire at the Empire State Building in New York City, killing a former co-worker before being gunned down by police. Ryan Pitcheralle was passing through the area when the shooting occurred, and used Instagram to capture a photograph of the victim lying in a pool of blood.
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I Am CC Allows Instagram Users to Share Under a Creative Commons License

Flickr’s Creative Commons licensing options allows its users to grant licenses that allow creators to make use of the photographs under a set of terms (e.g. attribution, non-commercial). Most photo sharing services have yet to bake Creative Commons licenses into their websites, but starting today, Instagram users can now release their photos under CC — albeit through a third-party solution.

It’s called I Am CC, and is a project started by LocalWiki founder Philip Neustrom that aims to “make the world a better, more creative place.”
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Protect Your Camera Gear from Burglars by Keeping it In Your Kid’s Room

If you want to protect your pricey camera gear from burglars, one of the safest places in your house (besides a safe, of course) is one that might not be very obvious to you: your kid’s room. The Readers Digest published a simple slideshow containing home-proofing tips gleaned from the minds of convicted burglars. One interesting tip is that burglars generally don’t go into children’s rooms when hunting for valuables to steal.
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First Glimpse at a Retro-styled Compact from Fuji, Possibly Named the “XP1″

Fuji already introduced retro, Leica-style design to the world of mirrorless cameras with its gorgeous X series line, and now it appears that the company wants to do the same thing for the world of point-and-shoots. New leaked photos, first published on Digicam-info, show an unknown compact camera by Fujifilm that features a slick leather wrap and an elegantly minimal UI — a camera that definitely wouldn’t embarrass fashion-forward folk.
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Kodak to Sell its Camera Film Business

It’s a sad day for film photographers: Kodak has announced that it will sell off its camera film business, one of the huge pillars of what made Kodak Kodak in the eyes of consumers around the world. It’s yet another step in the company’s effort to climb out of bankruptcy, which it hopes to do by next year, and transform itself into a commercial printing company.
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The Pixel Trade: Man Traveling the World with Photos Rather than Money

Everyone knows that traveling is expensive. Some people say that photography is expensive as well (both creating and buying it). The two things should therefore be a natural fit, right?

Australian photographer Shantanu Starick thinks so. He’s currently undertaking one of the most ambitious photo projects we’ve heard of: traveling the world with photos rather than money. His website, The Pixel Trade, tells the visual tale of his incredible journey.
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Photographs of Birds Caught in Mist Nets

John James Audubon, a French-American ornithologist (a person who studies birds), became internationally known in the 1800s for his ambitious goal of painting and documenting all the different bird species found in the United States. His methods, however, weren’t exactly bird friendly. To prepare his subjects, Audubon would first kill them using fine shot and then fix them into striking poses using wire.

Ornithologists these days have a much better way of capturing birds for science: mist nets. The nylon mesh nets virtually invisible to birds when suspended between two poles, and allow scientists to capture, study, and release the birds unharmed. Photographer Todd R. Forsgren wants to be the modern day equivalent of Audubon. His project titled Ornithological Photographs consists entirely of photos showing different birds caught in mist nets.
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IKEA Slowly Shedding Photography in Favor of Computer Renders

Of the two images above, one of them is a computer render and one of them is an actual photograph. Can you tell which is which? If you can’t, why should IKEA?

The Wall Street Journal reports that IKEA is slowly moving away from using photography in its catalogs in favor of CGI for its online and print publications.
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