videogames

The Gaming Community is Embracing Photography in the Virtual World

There’s an inherent freedom to photography as a creative outlet, especially when you’re capturing landscapes or urban environments. But the COVID era has seen many of us confined to our homes and cut off from the world around us.

Computer Games, Spatial Awareness, and Photographic Composition

One of the most unintentionally useful influences on my photography has turned out to be the time I’ve spent playing computer games. Some photographers use cinema as a learning tool to observe the way cinematographers and DOP’s use their cameras to capture a scene. This can be a great source of inspiration, but I think it can lead to some photographers heading out and seeking to recreate shots or aesthetic styles (color palette, depth of field, grain, etc) rather than capturing anything unique for them.

New Doom Mod Adds a Selfie Stick and 37 Instagram Filters to the Classic Game

It's becoming trendy to offer selfies as a feature in video games now. Just weeks after World of Warcraft added self-portraits through a new patch, the classic first-person-shooter Doom is getting the same treatment -- albeit unofficially.

There's a new mod for the game called "InstaDoom" that adds a selfie stick and 37 Instagram filters to the game, opening the door to some strange in-game photo ops.

Nostalgic Photo Series Shows the Evolution of Video Game Controllers

Photographer Javier Laspiur has long been a fan of video games and their respective consoles. And so, to pay tribute to the consoles of his past and the memories he made with them, he created a series that takes us on a journey through the consoles of Laspiur’s past and gives us a fascinating 'time-lapse' look at how much consoles have changed over the decades.

What Classic Video Games Would Look Like in the Real World

Prior to the fancy graphics video game players enjoy today, classic games were based on simple geometric forms. German photographer Patrick Runte decided to do a quirky photo project exploring what these games might look like if translated to the real world. His series, titled Jump 'N' Run, shows people dressed in simple costumes of "characters" from games like Pac-Man, Pong, and Tetris.

What if Learning to Use Photoshop Was More Like Learning to Play Portal?

Learning to play a game and learning to use Photoshop follow two, very different patterns. In the first you "discover" how the game is played, you fiddle with the buttons, try combinations, have eureka moments and eventually become proficient at it. Learning Photoshop, on the other hand, requires extensive tutorials and help; books are available from thin "easy-to-use" instruction books to heavy tomes many hundreds of pages long.

How Playing Video Games Can Help You Become a Better Street Photographer

People ask me, “Jun Shen, how do you shoot so fast on the streets?!?” I’m like a ninja, whipping out my camera, shooting it, and putting it away so quickly that my subjects don’t know what hit them. They walk away whispering to themselves, “What was that? Did he take our photo?

It’s thanks to video games, folks. Read on to find out why.

Portraits of Online Gamers Next to Their Alter Egos

For his project Alter Ego, photographer Robbie Cooper traveled around the world to shoot portraits of online gamers. He then combined his portraits with screenshots of the gamers' avatars in the various games they play, showing an interesting side-by-side comparison of what the people look like in the real world compared to what they choose to look like in their fantasy worlds. The project got its start back in 2003 after Cooper did a shoot with a CEO who used the game Everquest to communicate with his children after getting divorced.