totalsolareclipse

This is the World’s First Hyperlapse of a Solar Eclipse from 165,000ft

In August of 2017, the team at Sent Into Space travelled to Fort Laramie, Wyoming to capture something incredible for the BBC. Using a high-altitude weather balloon and a 360° camera array, they captured what they claim is "the world's first hyperlapse of an eclipse from the edge of space."

How I Shot a Time-Lapse of the Total Solar Eclipse in Argentina

One of the best things time-lapse photography has given me is my interest in astronomy. When I started shooting the night sky, I needed to learn basic astronomy in order to understand what I was photographing. Thanks to that, I was able to capture a time-lapse of the total solar eclipse this past July 2nd in Córdoba, Argentina.

What I Learned from Capturing My First Total Solar Eclipse

Last week I made the long trip from the UK to Chile in the hopes of capturing my first total solar eclipse. I had experienced a cloudy total solar eclipse from the UK in 1999 but back then I was just 9 years old and certainly no photographer. Now that I’m apparently a professional landscape astrophotographer, a total solar eclipse was a gaping hole in my portfolio.

This Eclipse Photo Was Shot from a Commercial Plane at 39,000ft

Photographers across the country pointed their cameras at the Sun during "The Great American Eclipse" on August 21st, 2017, but photographer Jon Carmichael managed to capture one of the most memorable shots from an unusual vantage point: he was sitting on a commercial airliner at 39,000 feet.

How I Shot Cliff Divers with a Total Solar Eclipse

This is a post about photography plus trigonometry. I remember half joking with my math teachers in high school, asking “why do we need to learn this? I’m never going to use it in life.” Fast forward to 4 months ago when Red Bull Media House calls and wants to shoot a cliff diver eclipse photo.

Little Planet Photo Shows a Total Solar Eclipse Over Norway

When a total solar eclipse occurred back on March 20, 2015, photographer György Soponyai decided to capture it in a creative way. He shot a series of photos of the sun traveling across the sky above Norway, and then stitched the images together into the above "little planet" photo of the sun being eclipsed.