photoprinting

Soft Proofing Your Photos to Get the Most From Your Printer

As photographers, one of the most exciting parts of our job is to print the fantastic photos we capture. As eager as we are to get the prints, we need to ensure we follow the entire pre-printing process to the T to ensure you have realistic prints. One crucial step in the process is soft proofing.

Why Inkjet Photo Printers Are So Bad (And What You Can Do About It)

Remember those halcyon film days? You mailed off that little black cartridge in an envelope and then about a week later negatives and prints were magically returned. With the rise of digital, the inkjet printer promised instant gratification at low per print prices. What could possibly go wrong?

The Best Online Photo Printing Services in 2022

Thanks to the smartphone camera, we can capture any memory we choose, at any time, but they’re more vulnerable -- and temporary -- than ever, but they all feel more temporary than ever. This is the modern paradox.

Costco is Closing All Photo Centers

Costco has announced that it will be closing the Photo Centers in all its locations by February 14, 2021. The announcement was made known to Costco Photo Center patrons via email early this morning.

Kodak Alaris is Bringing Back the Photo Kiosk with the M1 Order Station

Remember those old photo printing kiosks you used to find in convenience stores and pharmacies? Kodak Moments is trying to bring these back into vogue by releasing the M1 Order Station: a printing kiosk that seeks to "capitalize on consumers’ interest for photo products by offering high-quality prints from their smartphones."

Costco Closing (Some) In-Store Photo Depts., Cites Plummeting Printing

Costco's wholesale warehouse stores used to be an ultra-affordable place to get film developed, as it charged less than $2 a roll while competitors often charged several times as much. But film processing started disappearing from Costco locations a few years ago (to the dismay of many). Now the entire in-store photo departments may be the next to go.

Why Printing Your Photos Will Make You a Better Photographer

Print your photos. This little piece of advice goes far beyond the simple joy of holding a photograph in your hand. In fact, printing your photos will make you a better photographer and help you hold on to the fulfillment that comes from taking pictures. Here's why.

I Combined Digital Photography with a 174-Year-Old Hand-Printing Process

I entered the world of photography when digital cameras where already on the rise, and as a result, I learned photography on digital. That being said, I am a sucker for anything analog... the sensation of using real organic materials to produce photographs excites me.

Digital Photo Printing: 10 Years After

In 2003, my first "Mastering Digital Printing" book came out. My goal was to create an in-depth reference to the new world of digital printing for photography and fine art. I had a sense that there was a need, especially by photographers, for good information about "this new way to print" images (digitally). I guess I was right because the book was an instant success; it was actually in the Top 5 on Amazon Books jockeying with John Grisham and Michael Crichton in sales ranks for a short while. It was the right book at the right time. And I went on to write a second edition and a couple of related books before moving on to other things, all relating to photography.

Company Upcycles Wasted Canvas From Photo Printing to Raise Money for Charity

When the company CanvasPop puts a customer's photo onto, well, canvas, they often wind up with a bunch of scraps that they have to throw away. Not only are there excess pieces that have been cut off during the wrapping process, but sometimes entire prints don't make it through quality assurance and have to be tossed.

In a fit of philanthropic brilliance, the company realized that this is a waste and decided to put the excess canvas to some positive use. That's how they came up with the Remade Wallet: cool looking canvas wallets that CanvasPop now makes and sells, donating the profits to charity.

Shutterfly Gobbles Up Another Camera Company Photo Sharing Site

Shutterfly is making a habit of gobbling up photo sharing services that camera companies no longer want to run. Less than half a year after acquiring Kodak Gallery from Kodak for a meager $23.8 million, Shutterfly has now taken another photo site off the hands of a company very similar to Kodak: Fujifilm. The Japanese imaging company has agreed to dump its photo sharing and printing business SeeHere into Shutterfly's lap, shutting down the service on November 8, 2012.