gravity

OK Go’s New Music Video Was Shot in Zero Gravity in a Single Take

(function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.3"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs);}(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));OK Go - Upside Down & Inside OutHello, Dear Ones. Please enjoy our new video for "Upside Down & Inside Out". A million thanks to S7 Airlines. #GravitysJustAHabitPosted by OK Go on Thursday, February 11, 2016

It seems that with each new music video, the band OK Go breaks new ground in creativity. Today the band just released a new music video for the song "Upside Down & Inside Out." The 3-minute video, shown above, was shot in one take in zero gravity in a real plane flying through the sky.

"What you are about to see is real," OK Go says. "There are no wires or green screen."

How to Shoot a Gravity-Defying Fashion Photo

New York-based photographer Alexi Lubomirski was recently commissioned by Allure Magazine to shoot a series of fashion photos titled "Mood Elevators." The images show a man floating around as he walks next to a woman.

Photos of Various Food Dishes Flying Through the Air

Camden, London-based commercial still life photographer Piotr Gregorczyk likes to play with food and gravity. One concept he has focused on for a number of recent projects is the idea of showing various food dishes flying through the air as they come together on a plate or in a bowl.

NASA Releases Beautiful ‘Gravity’-Inspired Photo Set Ahead of Oscar Night

Spoiler Alert: The first paragraph of this article gives away a major part of the movie 'Gravity.' Skip past it if you haven't seen the movie yet.

"You should see the sun shining on the Ganges. It's amazing..." says George Clooney in the movie 'Gravity,' as his character floats through the cold vastness of space, cool as only a very George Clooney-ish character can be when facing insurmountable odds and indescribable beauty all at the same time.

But while Sandra Bullock's character had more important things to worry about just that second, chances are anyone reading this doesn't. And so, ahead of the Oscars where 'Gravity' is bound to take home at least a few of the golden statuettes, NASA has released a beautiful photo series to remind us what the view really looks like from space.

Tough Little Camera Captures Its Own Accidental Fall From Plane

On its own, the video above is horribly filmed and some of the most difficult-to-watch footage you'll ever see, but what it shows makes it fascinating. It's a point-of-view look at what it's like to fall 12,500 feet without a parachute... and survive. Skydiver Lucas Damm was jumping out of a plane over British Columbia recently when his helmet-mounted GoPro camera smacked against the plane door and fell out of its holder. The camera, still rolling, fell the entire way down and miraculously escaped without any damage.

Gravity-Defying Shots Created Using a Featureless Room

For its 2010 lookbook, Swedish fashion brand Courtrai Apparel created some gravity-defying shots of a guy floating in a featureless room. Rather than use fancy computer trickery, they used the same perspective trick as the Carl Kleiner project we shared a couple days ago.

Minimalist Gravity-Defying Photos Using String and Perspective

Photographer Carl Kleiner, the man behind IKEA's beautiful baking recipe and kitchen item photographs, has a delightful new series of images that features things neatly arranged in mid-air instead of on a table. More specifically, each of the shots uses simply trickery to make household objects look like they're floating in a blue room.

Photos of Falling Chocolate Confections Created Without CGI

Japan-based art collective NAM shot this series of advertisements showing gravity-defying chocolate confections. What's interesting about the concept is that they decided to do everything without digital trickery, opting instead to hang the various foods from thin strings.

Mind-Bending Portraits That Defy Gravity

French artist Philippe Ramette captures surreal self-portraits in which he appears to be defying gravity. Rather than use digital trickery, Ramette -- who started his career as a sculptor -- builds metal support structures that allow him to stand or sit at impossible angles.

The Jaw-Dropping Gravity-Defying Photography of Li Wei

Li Wei is a Beijing-based artist that creates jaw-dropping scenes using mirrors, metal wires, scaffolding, and acrobatics. Check out his website here.

PetaPixel: Can you tell us about yourself and your background?

Li Wei: I was born in HuBei province. I studied oil painting when I was in college. And I went to Beijing in 1993 and went to East village, artists such like Zhang Huan influenced me a lot. So I started my performance art career before turning to photography. Today, photography is only a way of expressing, not my only medium. I also make statues. You can see performance elements in my works. I think this is my background.