Posts Tagged ‘sun’

Make a Quick DIY Sun Filter Using a Floppy Disk

If you want to snap a photograph of the sun (perhaps during an eclipse) without burning your camera sensor, one quick way is to make a dark filter using an unwanted floppy disk (remember those?). You’ll need to carefully harvest the black magnetic film inside the disk and slice out a piece to cover your lens with. Two words of warning: don’t crease the film, lest you make it unusable, and don’t use the filter with your human eyes.

Floppy Disk Sun Filter [Instructables]

A High Definition Time-Lapse of Venus Flying Past the Sun

There was a much-hyped transit of Venus yesterday in which Venus appeared as a small black circle moving across the face of the sun. This rare phenomenon occurs in pairs of eight years separated by more than a century: the previous transit was in 2004, but the next one won’t occur until 2117. If you missed out, don’t worry — there’s a boatload of beautiful photos and videos out there that can give you an even better view than what your eyes would have seen. The amazing high-definition video above was created using images from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.
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Manhattanhenge: A Unique Bi-Annual Photo Op for New Yorkers

Twice per year something really cool happens: the stars, or rather one particular star, aligns with the grid of streets running through Manhattan island, offering photographers and astronomers alike an opportunity to go out and snap a few very unique and very cool photos. On May 29th (today) and July 12th of this year (it varies a bit each year) the sun sets in perfect alignment with the Manhattan grid. It’s known as “Manhattanhenge“. On those specific days, when the sun sets, you will see half of the glowing orb above and half below the horizon — although you can still get some cool, though not quite as perfect, photos on the days before and after.
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Time-Lapse of Yesterday’s Solar Eclipse

Photographer Cory Poole created this time-lapse video of yesterday’s solar eclipse using 700 photographs shot through a telescope that filters out the sun’s photosphere and captures its chromosphere. Wikipedia has some neat photos of the eclipse, including images of crescent shaped shadows cast by the sun during the event.

(via kottke.org)

Cross Photos Showing the First and Last Light of the Winter Solstice

Starting in 2001, photographer Mary Mattingly has created an image every year on the winter solstice — the day of the year when daylight is shortest — showing the first light of the day and the last light of the day blended into a single photo. The series is called “First Light / Last Light“.
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How to Shoot Creative Macro Photos Using Sunlight

Here’s a short video in which photo instructor Bryan Peterson shows how you can use sunlight and a simple reflector for creative macro shots — perfect for people who have a macro lens but lack lighting equipment.

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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More People Have Walked on the Moon Than Have Captured the Analemma

Want a challenging photography project? Try capturing an analemma in a single shot. “Analemma” is the name given to the figure-eight shape traced by the sun if photographed at the same time of day over the course of a year. To capture it, you’ll need to leave your camera in a fixed position and shoot photos at exactly the same time of day for all of the shots.
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Exploding Hydrogen Balloons Shot Matrix-style with 24 Canon DSLRs

To capture “portraits of the sun” and to illustrate its power, General Electric filled 20 weather balloons with hydrogen and helium, surrounded them with 24 Canon DSLR cameras (18 7Ds and 6 60Ds), and shot the balloons exploding Matrix-style.

(via Laughing Squid)

SunCalc Provides a Map View for Checking Sunlight and Golden Hour

SunCalc is a super-simple web app created with Google Maps and Javascript that helps you determine the best time to shoot depending on the quality of light you want in your photos.

You can see sun positions at sunrise, specified time and sunset. The thin orange curve is the current sun trajectory, and the yellow area around is the variation of sun trajectories during the year. The closer a point is to the center, the higher is the sun above the horizon. The colors on the time slider above show sunlight coverage during the day.

It was created by Vladimir Agafonkin. Similar apps include The Golden Hour Calculator and The Twilight Calculator.

Large Format Instant Film Seared by Long Exposures to UV Light

Solaroids are unique prints created by photographer Jeff Mclane by exposing large format (4×5 in) Fuji instant film to direct UV light for long periods of time.
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