Posts Published in October 2011

Volcano Casts a Giant Shadow Across Clouds at Sunrise

Tumwater, Washington resident Nick Lippert captured this amazing photograph of Mt. Rainier casting a long shadow across low hanging clouds. It was shot at 7:40 in the morning using a Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS3. Talk about being in the right place at the right time…

Check out the full-res version here (it makes for a great wallpaper). KOMO News also has a gallery containing more photos from this particular morning.

(via KOMO News via Discover via Coudal)

Focus Stacking for Speed: Researcher Invents Light-Efficient Photography

Google scientist Sam Hasinoff has come up with a technique called “light-efficient photography” that uses focus-stacking to reduce the amount of time exposures require. In traditional photography, increasing the depth of field in a scene requires reducing the size of the aperture, which reduces the amount of light hitting the sensor and increases the amount of time required to properly expose the photo. This can cause a problem in some situations, such as when a longer exposure would lead to motion blur in the scene.

Hasinoff’s technique allows a camera to capture a photo of equal exposure and equivalent depth of field in a much shorter amount of time. He proposes using a wide aperture to capture as much light as possible, and using software to compensate for the shallow depth of field by stacking multiple exposures. In the example shown above, the camera captures an identical photograph twice as fast by simply stacking two photos taken with larger apertures.

Light-Efficient Photography (via Amateur Photographer)

Weekend Project: Build a DIY Lensbaby

DIYPhotography has a neat tutorial on how you can build a DIY Lensbaby lens with cheap parts. The ingredients list consists of a macro extension tube, some electric tape, a macro filter set, and a pipe clamp.

Build a Lynny – A DIY Lensbaby [DIYPhotography]

Grndctrl Will Tell You How Long It’ll Take to Save up for That Gear You’re Eyeing

Want to know how long it’ll take you to save up for that camera or lens you’ve been dreaming of buying? grndctrl, an uber-simple personal finance web app, can tell you. It doesn’t take any personal details, but simply asks for your income, expenses, and savings amounts. You can then provide it with a list of “rewards” that you’d like to save up for, and it will give you estimates of how long you’ll need to wait.

grndctrl (via MakeUseOf via Lifehacker)

Nighttime Locations Illuminated Through Light Painting on an Epic Scale

German photographer Berthold Steinhilber has an awesome technique for lighting expansive locations at night: he tediously paints in the light manually with a powerful 1.8-pound headlamp powered by a 12-volt car battery. Depending on the scale of the location, his large format film exposures last anywhere from 45 minutes to 2 hours, with the aperture set between f/8 and f/16. The above photo took 1.5 hours at f/16.
Read more…

ACLU Sues L.A. Sheriff’s Department for Harassing Photographers

The ACLU of Southern California has filed a lawsuit against the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and several of its deputies, claiming that they unlawfully harassed, detained, and searched photographers simply because they were taking pictures. The suit asks the court to instruct the Sheriff’s Department to stop detaining citizens on the basis of photography, and also seeks damages. ACLU attorney Peter Bibring tells the LA Times,

Photography is not a crime. It’s protected 1st Amendment expression. It violates the Constitution’s core protections for sheriff’s deputies to detain and search people who are doing nothing wrong. To single them out for such treatment while they’re pursuing a constitutionally protected activity is doubly wrong.

One of the confrontations cited by the lawsuit was captured on camera, and can be seen here. The Los Angeles Times notes that similar lawsuits have been filed in other states as well. Earlier this year the Long Beach police department came under fire after it came to light that officers were instructed to be on the lookout for photos with “no apparent aesthetic value”.

ACLU sues Sheriff’s Department, alleges photographers were harassed [Los Angeles Times]


Thanks for the tip, Marc!

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

Read more…

Photo of Laser Pointer Through Rain Reveals Water Drop “Snowflakes”

On a rainy day recently, light painting photographer Jeremy Jackson was playing around with a green laser pointer when he discovered something interesting: all the out of focus raindrops in the photograph had a lined pattern in them — and each one was unique! These “water drop snowflakes” were found in all of the photos he took that day.

Anyone know what causes this phenomenon?

(via DIYPhotography)


Image credit: Photograph by Jeremy Jackson and used with permission

Oldest Known Print of Iconic Cartier-Bresson Photo to Be Auctioned

Behind the Gare St. Lazare is one of French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson‘s best known photographs, and is frequently cited as an example of his “decisive moment” approach to photography. The photograph was made in 1932, but the oldest known print is dated 1946. That print will be sold at a Christie’s auction on November 11th along with 100 other signed prints, and is expected to fetch up to ~$250,000.

(via Christies via Foto Actualidad)

Google+ Now Has Retro Filters

The success of Instagram has shown that photo filters are very much in demand with the general population. Facebook is rumored to be working on its own retro filters, but Google has beaten it to the punch: today the company introduced a wide range of creative filters to Google+’s Creative Kit. The filters (called “Effects”) include looks that mimic daguerreotypes, Reala 400 film, Polaroid pictures, Lomo, Holga, and even cross processed film.
Read more…

Lens Band: A Gel Bracelet for Your Lens to Prevent Zoom Creep

Zoom creep is what happens when gravity causes your lens to zoom in or out due to it being pointed up or down. While it’s not really an issue when you’re shooting hand-held, it can cause problems if you’re trying to keep the zoom fixed while the camera’s on a tripod. A trick to combat this is to use rubber bands to keep the zoom ring still, but now there’s a fancier solution to this problem: the Lens Band. It’s a gel bracelet-style band that’s wrapped around the zoom ring when not needed. When you want to freeze the zoom, simply slide half of the band over the lens body.

They’re available in a variety of colors and sizes to fit most lenses, and cost $5 each from the Lens Band website.

Lens Band (via Pixiq)