response

Canon Rebuffs Rumors That Its R3 Sensor is Made by Sony

Since Canon's initial development announcement for the EOS R3, rumors have swirled that the company -- despite its statement otherwise -- was not the manufacturer of the backside illuminated sensor at its core. A report published on June 17 stated factually that the R3 sensor is made by Sony, and Canon has responded.

Street Photography Is Not a Crime. Let’s Keep it That Way.

The New York Daily News recently published an opinion piece by a writer named Jean Son titled “When your photograph harms me: New York should look to curb unconsensual photography of women” and I would like to address it here.

Canon Responds: There is No Delay in EOS R5 Shipments

Following yesterday's reports from Canon Rumors and EOSHD about delays in shipping of the EOS R5 to retailers, Canon has released a statement to set the record straight. There is no delay, says Canon. The first shipment is going out this week, as promised.

My Response to David Burnett’s Open Letter to the NPPA

Dear Mr. Burnett,

I have some concerns I’d like to address in your recent open letter regarding the Photo Bill of Rights (BoR). I am a 36-year-old white female editorial and commercial photographer. I am a member of APA and a Houston chapter board member for ASMP.

Dear Entitled Aspiring Photographer…

Dear Entitled, I came across a screenshot of your “I have started a photography business” post in a “Classifieds” Facebook group.

That Time I Said ‘F*** No’ to a Hotel’s ‘Advertising Opportunity’

My name is Ryan Horban and I’m a wedding photographer based in Southern California. I shoot 30+ weddings a year, drink IPAs because they are tasty and get me buzzed, have an amazing family that I absolutely love, and won’t be staying at a Sheraton Hotel anytime in the near future unless I’m kidnapped by terrorists and held against my will at a Sheraton property.

No, You Can’t Use My Photos On Your Brand’s Instagram For Free

My name is Max Dubler, and I am a professional photographer who has been working full time in downhill skateboarding for the last several years. I am a well-known person within this little niche: I started an influential website with my friends, was on staff for the only downhill magazine since its first issue, have written extensively about downhill skate safety, and have been hired by almost every major downhill skate brand to shoot photos.

Fukushima Photographer Defends Photos After Accusations of Fakery

If you follow just about any major news outlet, you're bound to have seen the photos of "Fukushima Kid." We published them ourselves. But today the photographer behind those shots, Keow Wee Loong, is on the defensive as another photographer accuses him of lying about the photos in search of fame.

Steve McCurry Says He Will ‘Rein in His Use of Photoshop’

Steve McCurry has responded to the recent hoopla surrounding his Photoshopped photos. The famed photographer explains that he's now a "visual storyteller" rather than a photojournalist, but says he will "rein in his use of Photoshop" going forward to remove any confusion.

In Defense of Sony’s Pro Mirrorless Cameras

The photographer Sator has created quite a buzz with his article "Why Sony’s Full Frame Pro Mirrorless Was a Fatal Mistake." I thought long and hard about whether I should response to this or not. I think there are many things omitted in his analysis and I want to point out some of those points.

When a Pulitzer Prize-Winning Photographer is Asked for Free Photos…

Want to see how a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer responds to a request for free images in exchange for "credit" from a major news corporation? You can, because that exchange happened a few days ago.

David Carson is photojournalist with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch who won the Pulitzer Prize with his paper this year for his coverage of protests in Ferguson, Missouri. Last Friday, Carson was contacted by what appears to be a CBS account on Twitter that regularly Tweets requests for image usage.

Jason Sheldon: My Response to Taylor Swift’s Agent

After my public response to Taylor Swift’s open letter to Apple, I didn’t quite expect the phenomenal reaction it received. I knew it was provocative. I knew it was going to be risky and could possibly harm my chances of getting access to other concerts in future, but it needed to be said -- out loud. When I thought hard about the possible consequences, and restrictions on my access to future work, I asked myself “What point is there in going to work if I can’t be paid for it, yet everyone else gets to benefit from my labor?”. The answer?

There was nothing left to lose. When you’re faced with a choice of working for free to save a millionaire having to pay a reasonable fee, or not working at all, what would you do?