opensource

Triggertrap Open Sources Its Mobile Dongle Hardware

As Triggertrap continues winding down its business, their Triggertrap Mobile Dongles are becoming increasingly difficult to find. But there's some good news now: the company has decided to open source the hardware, making it is possible to build your own dongle.

Google’s Guetzli Makes JPEGs 35% Smaller Without Hurting Quality

Google has just released a brand new, open-source JPEG encoder called Guetzli that can do two very neat things. First, it can decrease JPEG file size by 35% without a noticeable decrease in quality, and second, it can increase the quality of an image without increasing file size at all.

Get More Performance Out of Your X-Trans Sensor with This Free Software

In my previous article on the difficulty FujiFilm’s X-Trans sensor has preserving fine color detail, I used the free software Darktable to process the RAW examples. I showed how, specifically in terms of color detail, Darktable was able to do a better job than FujiFilm’s own processing.

Build a DIY Flickr Auto-Uploader with Raspberry Pi

Flickr generated a lot of bad feelings back in March 2016 by making its Auto-Uploadr app a Pro-only feature. If you're not Pro but would still like the convenience of automatically uploading new photos, you can build a custom gadget that does it for you.

How to Shoot Bullet Time by Swinging an iPhone on a String

Skier Nicolas Vuignier recently shared a viral video in which he created "bullet time" footage of himself skiing by swinging an iPhone 6 around his head using a special contraption he built himself.

The original 3-minute video can be seen above, in case you haven't watched it yet. It amassed well over 3.5 million views in just a couple of weeks.

My Free and Open Source Photography Workflow

After several years of trial and error, I finally have a complete RAW photography workflow in Linux that I am happy with.

The applications in this workflow aren’t just native to Linux, they are also free, open source software (FOSS). There is no need to dual boot, use WINE or a virtual machine. It’s a pure FOSS photography workflow running in Linux.

VSCO Keys Lives On By Going Free and Open Source

In early September 2015, we reported that VSCO was discontinuing its VSCO Keys keyboard shortcut software for Lightroom. There's some good news today: instead of killing off the product, VSCO has decided to turn it into a free and open source project.

The Focal Camera: An Open Source Modular Camera

Over the past year, Dutch artist Mathijs van Oosterhoudt has been developing a new camera system. No, it's not a high-tech digital system that's intended to go up against the major camera companies. Instead, it's an open-modular camera system that's intended to teach people how to build complex cameras. Its name is The Focal Camera.

SourceForge Accused of Bundling GIMP with Adware

If you've downloaded a copy of GIMP for Windows from SourceForge in recent days, you may want to double check to make sure you didn't get other programs installed as well. Some copies of the "open source Photoshop" were apparently being offered with for-profit adware bundled with the installer.

Photog! Transforms Your Offline Pictures Folder Into a Photo Website

If you'd like to quickly create a custom photography website and are familiar with installing software through a command line interface, there's a new free and open source program you can check out. It's called Photog!, and is a simple photography website generator that can turn your pictures directory into a simple yet elegant photo website.

MIT Offers Documentary Photography and Photojournalism Course for Free Online

It’s not unusual for colleges with large open-source programs to put out a number of courses free for the world to browse through online. In the past we’ve featured courses from both MIT and Stanford.

Today, we have a new course from MIT. Taught in the Spring semester of 2009, this course came a full two years later than the original MIT course we shared and is packed full of useful information for anybody interested in photojournalism.

Lytro Makes Interactive Web Player Open-Source, Partners with 500px for Integration

A major drawback of Lytro's technology has been the closed ecosystem its files are trapped in. Unable to be edited in programs such as Lightroom or viewed on the Web without a proprietary image viewer, the experience is lacking the ubiquity needed to gain the acceptance of the masses.

Well aware of this problem, Lytro today takes the first of what we assume will be many steps in the right direction, by announcing that their images will now be viewable on the Internet via a new, open-source WebGL player.