musicvideo

LeAnn Rimes New Music Vid was Shot by a Vine Star… in Stop Motion… on an iPhone

If we start a post off by telling you that "the stop motion video above consists of 8,000 frames taken on an iPhone," you'd probably assume it was some small-time filmmaker or hobbyist that put it together, and most of the time you'd be right.

In this case, however, you'd be dead wrong. Because that's exactly how musicians LeAnn Rimes, Rob Thomas, and Jeff Beck decided to film the music video for their most recent collaboration, a song called "Gasoline and Matches."

Creative Lip Synching Music Video Created from 4,000 Portraits of 350 People

It's getting harder to impress these days when it comes to music videos, because there seems to be an abundance of uber-creative people putting together really interesting takes. A great example is this simple yet moving music video filmed entirely in the reflection of an eyeball.

The band The Paper Kites went a bit more complicated when putting together the music video for their song "Young," but the results are no less captivating.

Revisiting Pharcyde’s ‘Drop’ Backwards Music Video

Yesterday we shared an amazing time-lapse music video spanning 24-hours on a Parisian rooftop.  While the video did, in fact, make my jaw "drop" (there's a pun coming), it got me thinking about one of the most amazing music videos I've ever seen: "Drop" by The Pharcyde.

A Musician Spent 24 Hours Posing for this Amazing Time-Lapse Music Video

Every once in a while someone gets really, really creative and it makes our jaws drop. Such is the case with UK pop artist Dan Black's timelapse music video for his song called "Hearts."

In short, the video (created by the folks at Chic & Artistic) features Black and company on a Parisian rooftop -- for a full 24 hours. That's right, one full day of shooting (from 11AM to 11AM!).

Music Video Uses Animations Projected Onto Warm Breath in Freezing Temps

Here's a really creative idea that makes for a really cool and unique music video. For the second single off of his upcoming album Where You Stand, musician Travis teamed up with a creative directing duo to put together a music video shot entirely using an animation projected onto the band's breath in freezing temperatures.

Combining Time-Lapse and Stop Motion to Create a Mind-Bending Music Video

We've seen some pretty creative music videos in the past, ranging from a microscopic time-lapse to what looked to be a Google Street View music video. The latest creative musical endeavor that has caught our eye is a video by the California group The Grouch & Eligh (or G&E for short).

Working together with Colorado-based DJ Pretty Lights, they put together a video that combines traditional time-lapse and hyper lapse with stop motion for a mind-bending 'lyric lapse' experience similar to what we saw in Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams' Dream Music video.

Band Helps NPR Move Its ‘Tiny Desk’ and Makes an Epic Music Video in the Process

It took 223 takes, 8 hard-boiled eggs, 5 microphones, 2 days and 1 camera, but Bob Boilen's Tiny Desk -- which is featured in the Boilen-created Tiny Desk Concert series on NPR Music -- has officially been moved to NPR's new headquarters.

Why did it take so much video? Because Boilen decided to film a Tiny Desk Concert featuring the band OK Go during the move, producing the above music/moving video in the process.

Cool Music Video Made Up of 5,000 Stills is Equal Parts Creative and Creepy

It's always a good idea to get to know your neighbors. Case in point: photographer David Vincent Wolf recently found himself directing a mind-bending music video for the band Portugal. The Man, and all because his neighbor Rich Holtzman happens to be both the manager of the band and the father of his daughter's preschool classmate.

Entire Story Told Through Reflections in an Eyeball

Last Saturday, we featured a creative music video by the band James Wallace and the Naked Light that was shot entirely in one take in the reflection of a fan's eyeball. It was a wonderfully simple video and an approach we hadn't seen before in a music video.

But shortly after featuring that video, we were told that a similar idea had actually been done before by the Italian band K-Conjog, when they made the award-winning video for their song Qwerty.

Creative Music Video Shot Entirely in the Reflection of an Eyeball

Check out this creative and moving music video that was shot entirely through the reflection of an eyeball. The band is James Wallace and the Naked Light, the song is "To the River," and the video is a beautiful example of simplicity and creativity working hand in hand.

Stop Motion Musical Tours Through a City and a School

Photographer and director Greg Jardin made this creative music video for the song "New York City" by Joey Ramone. It's a stop-motion video that features 115 people (some of them random pedestrians yanked off the street) traveling backwards through various locations in New York City.

Using a Hand-Held Bullet-Time GoPro Rig to Shoot a Music Video

You might remember PermaGrin Films' Marc Donahue from his amazing "Dream Music: Part 2" lyric-lapse video that took 6 hours of work for every 3 seconds of footage. We even shared a behind the scenes look at how that time-lapse was put together, complete with deleted scenes and director commentary.

The First Ever Music Video Filmed Entirely Using Instagram

We all know Instagram as an app for retro-filtered photos, but have you ever considered using it to film a video, one photo at a time? That's what director Arturo Perez Jr. did for the video above. It's the official music video for the song "Invasión" by Mexico City-based band The Plastics Revolution.

BTS: Photographing a Lyric-Lapse Music Video Over the Course of Six Months

Back in August we shared a mesmerizing stop-motion video titled "Dream Music: Part 2" and created by Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams. The team spent 6-8 hours of work photographing every 3-4 seconds of the 8-minute music video. All in all, the project took six months to complete. The video above presents a behind-the-scenes look at how the whole thing was done, with director's commentary, deleted scenes, and a bunch of time-lapses of the time-lapse being shot.

Linkin Park Browser-Based Music Video Incorporates Your Facebook Photos

Linkin Park has released a new music video that makes creative use of online photos. Visit the website for the song "Lost in the Echo", and you'll be asked to connect with the music video using your Facebook account. Once you provide it with access, it crunches some data, and then starts playing. The video starts out like many other videos, showing a group of people in what appears to be some kind of post-apocalyptic hideout. Then one of the characters pulls out a suitcase with photos, and something catches you eye: personal photos from your Facebook albums are shown inside the video!

Lyric-Lapse Music Video That Required 6 Hours of Work for Every 3 Seconds

Dream Music: Part 2 is an amazing stop-motion and time-lapse video by Marc Donahue and Sean Michael Williams that features a technique they call "lyric-lapsing". Using still photos, they somehow planned the time-lapse sequences just right, so that the singer in the video is actually mouthing the words as he scurries around to various locations. They state that the video is a "musical voyage into the depths of the subconscious", and that it was designed to "transport the viewer from their own reality into a world of dreams and at the end, [...] awake to wonder how we were able to take them there."

The magnitude of the effort is what's truly impressive. The creators spent six months shooting the photos across two states. Every 3-4 seconds seen in the video required about 6-8 hours of work to create.

Dizzying Animations that Show What San Francisco Looks Like to Superman

Director Kevin Parry recently finished creating a music video for the song "Water Falls" by Kalle Mattson. Filmed by Andrea Nesbitt, the video features some crazy time-lapse shots over great distances in San Francisco. Parry has also turned the shots into these animated GIFs that show you what various locations would look like if you were Superman whizzing around.