internet

If You Use a WD My Book Live Hard Drive, Unplug It Immediately

Western Digital, most well known for making many types of popular hard drives including the My Book line external devices, is advising users to disconnect any My Book Live storage devices from the internet as soon as possible and until further notice to prevent files from being deleted.

Co-Creating a Light Painting in Real Time with Someone Across the World

Photographer Dan Roberts recently collaborated on an "intercontinental light painting." Using a projector and the power of the Internet, he and Frodo Alvarez captured a light-painting portrait in real time from across the world: Frodo's light from Spain ended up on Dan's camera in Denver.

Internet Addiction is Killing Your Photography

What I’m getting at in the headline is that the Internet is most likely the cause of your impotence when it comes to productivity. How many people pick up their smartphones and check something online or in an app in the morning, instead of picking up a camera and capturing a sunrise?

The Power of the Internet: My Journey from Vimeo to Planet Earth II

Five years ago I was somewhere in the wilds of central Vietnam, about to click upload on my first ever video project. If you had told me then that, in just a handful of years, I would be contributing to one of the entertainment world’s most prestigious and popular wildlife documentaries — BBC’s Planet Earth II — I think I’d have had trouble keeping a straight face. But that was before I witnessed firsthand the power of the Internet and a good idea.

Cameras are to Blame for Breaking the Internet Last Week

A few weeks ago, we shared an article about how cameras were used to launch the largest cyber attack in history. Then last week, a massive cyber attack quite literally broke the Internet. So, how did the hackers do it? You guessed right: cameras.

Time-Lapses Made with Photos Mined from the Web

Time-lapses are usually created with one or more cameras by one or more photographers working together to document a particular subject, but now scientists have created a new method of time-lapse creation that uses photographs found on the Internet.

Re: If You Don’t Want Your Photos Stolen, Don’t Post Them on the Internet

“If you don’t want your photos stolen, don’t post them on the Internet.”

This is an argument I have heard over and over again, mostly from people who have never had their work borrowed. Which of course is like saying, “I know you were home, but if you didn’t want your belongings stolen, you shouldn’t have left your door unlocked.”

Is The Print Portfolio Making a Comeback In the Age of The Internet?

In an age where social media fatigue is a real and prominent problem, photographer Erik Almas tries to stand out from the crowd by means of the age-old print portfolio. Detailing the ‘whys’ and ‘whats,’ he briefly goes over what it is that made him decide to go back to the physical portfolio and how his work is organized in the interesting video above.

4-Year-Old Murder Victim’s Photo Adorns Child Care Advertisement

You're looking for an image to illustrate your ad promoting child-care services and find a portrait of an adorable tot, obviously free for the taking because it's on the Internet. What could wrong?

More than you could dream up in your worst nightmares, as promoters of the Montreux Jazz Festival have learned after misappropriating an image of a child who turned out to be the victim in one France's most notorious murder cases of recent times.

Pictures Over Experience?

We recently published an article about She & Him enacting an anti-photo policy at a gig. Signs were posted saying “At the request of Matt [Ward] and Zooey [Deschanel], we ask that people not use their cell phones to take pictures and video, but instead enjoy the show they have put together in 3D”.

It reminded me of a story my Father told me about a Frank Zappa concert. Apparently, people were given opaque-lens glasses at the request of Zappa and the band so that, audience-members could more fully experience the music without any visual distractions.

How They Sent Photos Across the Ocean Back in 1926

These days, it's easy to take for granted what the magic of the Internet, wireless technology and fiber optic cables has made possible, but there was a time when sending a photograph a long distance in a short time wasn't quite that easy.

For instance, in 1926, someone on an oceanliner called the S.S. President Roosevelt snapped the above photo of the S.S. Antinoe during a rescue attempt. When that photo was sent almost instantly from London to New York City, it was such a big deal that the April 1926 issue of Science and Invention printed a huge infographic to show its readers how this miracle was achieved.

Video Breaks Down the Sheer Number of Photos Uploaded Every Minute

In a recent video, the people over at BuzzFeed decided to put numbers to all of the things that happen online every single minute. And in-between facts regarding how many Google Searches and Tweets go out every 60 seconds, they also included a few really interesting photo facts.