graffiti

Do NOT Do This to Iconic Landmarks

New York-based photographer Felix Kunze was recently visiting the iconic Lion's Head mountain in Table Mountain National Park in Cape Town, South Africa, when he came across this sight at his favorite rock in a well-known lookout: a group of people had decided to scribble their full names into the rock that's featured in countless photos.

Italian Artist Creates Negative Graffiti that Reveals True Colors When Inverted

One of the coolest types of graffiti we've ever seen is Gifiti, where an artist paints several slightly different pieces in the same spot, photographing each piece, and then puts the photos together into a final animated piece of street art. It's downright amazing and the time required is mind-boggling.

But as cool as Gifiti is, we might have just found our new favorite photography-inspired graffiti genre: negative graffiti.

Graffiti Artist Sues Production Companies for $45K for Using His Tag in Their Show and Promo Materials

The next time you want to photograph some cool graffiti, you might want to think twice... you could get sued by the artist if that picture makes it big.

After the popular Canadian drama 30 Vies aired, graffiti artist Alexandre Veilleux recognized a tag of his in the opening sequence. Now, Veilleux -- who goes by Alex Scaner in the graffiti community -- is seeking $45k in damages from Radio-Canada and Productions Aetios Inc., stating they used his work without permission.

Prolific Graffiti Artist Brags Over Instagram, Earns 23 Counts of Felony Vandalism

If we've said it once, we've said a thousand times: don't post illegal activity to Instagram. Because while the photo sharing service does sometimes seem to be the domain of teenaged girls with a duck face problem and hipsters who would like to share their latte with you, the police also spend time on there.

That's a lesson notorious NYC graffiti artist Peter Podsiadlo, better known as SEMP, learned the hard way this week when his Instagram photos earned him 23 felony counts of vandalism.

Chasing 5 Pointz

I first heard about 5 Pointz in a Wall Street Journal article in the summer of 2011. The article detailed the recent attempts by the owner to knock what had become an internationally-reknown street art mecca down, and build high-rise condominiums.

Take a Look at the Unseen Side of NYC with ‘Exploring Off-Limits New York’

New York City culture site Animal recently teamed up with photographer and urban explorer 2e to document the making of some photographs in his collection “Exploring Off-Limits New York.”

From Brooklyn’s Domino Sugar Factory to The UnderBelly Project, the video and accompanying story takes a look at some of 2e's not-so-legal and potentially dangerous adventures.

Hyperlapse Captures Four Graffiti Artists Covering an Entire Warehouse

Back in June, graffiti artist Sofles was featured in a hyperlapse that showed him making his way around an abandoned building and creating various impressive tags at super speed. That video was received very well, so naturally, if one graffiti artist is good, four would be four times better right?

Please Draw Me a Wall: Creative Photos of People Interacting with Graffiti

French photographer Julien Coquentin's series Please Draw Me a Wall is a curious combination of street art and photography. By having his subjects (sometimes himself) interact with wall art as if it were real, he creates fantasy worlds using only a few props and drawings that some call art and others defacement.

Zany Picture Frame Concept Encourages ‘Vandalism,’ Let You Draw on Your Pics

Typically, the only people who would take a marker to your pictures would be your kids when you're not paying attention. But wouldn't it be at least a little fun to pretend you were a kid again, take out a marker, and just go to town on a few of your photos?

Designer Brian Khouw obviously thinks so, which is why he came up with a concept picture frame dubbed the Vandalijst -- a frame that actually encourages you to doodle on your photos.

Hyperlapse Shows One of the Best Graffiti Artists in the World at Work

Many of the time-lapses and hyperlapses we run across follow natural events (like a massive rotating supercell) or capture the hustle and bustle of a city in a unique light. The video above does neither. Instead, photographer and videographer Selina Miles shot it while following one of the world's best graffiti artists around an abandoned warehouse as he tags it to kingdom come.

Woman Arrested After Posting Photo of Anti-Police Graffiti to Instagram

Montreal resident Jennifer Pawluck was arrested earlier this week after she posted the above photo of anti-police graffiti to her Instagram account. The photo shows a caricature of Montreal police Commander Ian Lafrenière with a bullet hole in his forehead, leading police to accuse Pawluck of criminal harassment against a high-ranking police officer.

Animated GIFs Created with Photographs of Large-Scale Street Art

Animated GIFs are often created with a sequence of photographs, but UK-based artist INSA puts an interesting twist on the concept by mixing the concept with graffiti and time-lapsing. For his GIF-iti projects, he paints large-scale street art pieces on various walls and surfaces (e.g. the side of a truck) over a number of days. Once each version of the piece is complete, it's saved as a photographed with a camera fixed in a certain location.

After the series of graffiti pieces is completed, the photographs are strung together into unique animated GIFs.

Momentum: Photos of Quantum Mechanic Calculations Scribbled on Chalkboards

For his project titled "Momentum", London/Madrid-based photographer Alejandro Guijarro spent three years visiting a number of the leading quantum mechanic research institutions of the world and photographed the chalkboards there exactly as he found them. The resulting photographs look like intelligent graffiti drawn by some of the brightest minds in science.

Augmented Reality App Puts Virtual Images on Physical Walls

LZRTAG is a free Android app that lets you generate QR codes associated with uploaded images -- mostly animated .gif images. The codes can be printed out and placed on walls and other surfaces. When scanned with the Android app, the codes call up the associated image and display it in an augmented reality on your phone.

Marc Jacobs Slaps Graffitied Store Photo onto Shirt, Gets Last Laugh

Don't mess with Marc Jacobs. That's the lesson graffiti artists should take from a teensy little altercation between Marc Jacobs and the infamous graffiti artist Kidult. When Marc Jacobs employees awoke to a vandalized Soho boutique the morning after the Met Ball, they snapped a few photos before starting to clean it up. But instead of just stopping there and moving on, Marc Jacobs decided instead to turn the whole thing on its head, slap the photo on a t-shirt, and sell it with the caption "Art by Art Jacobs."