Posts Tagged ‘instant’

Turn Your Old Digital Photos into Faux Instax Prints

Eve Johnson of Evalicious wanted to turn some old digital photographs into Instax-style prints for a travel journal, so she decided to make some fake ones. She arranged two photos on each template, saved them as 4×6 prints, had them made at a local print shop, and then cut them out in Instax dimensions. You can find the low down over on her blog.

faux instax: how to [shopEvalicious]

DIY Instant Photo Display Made From a Wood Lattice and Clothespins

Talia van der Wel of New Zealand wanted a simple and beautiful way to display instant photos, and came up with the idea of an empty frame in which photos are hung on clothespins from twine. After sharing the idea with her husband, he went and created the frame out of an old wood lattice.
Read more…

Instant Instagram Books by Blurb

You can now create instant photo books with your favorite Instagram (AKA two-minute noodle) photos using Blurb. After logging into the page with your Instagram account, your most “liked” photo is used for the cover and the rest of the pages are filled with your most recent images (they can be changed, of course). A 40-photo, 20-page book starts at $11.

Make Instagram books with Blurb [Blurb]

Expired Polaroid 600 Film from eBay

Needed a Polaroid picture for a project I’m working on, so I purchased a Polaroid One Step camera for $15 off a guy on Craigslist and a pack of Polaroid 600 film that expired back in 2003 for $26 with shipping from eBay. I was a bit concerned that the film wouldn’t work anymore, but found that the battery in the film pack still had some juice and that the film still developed, though the upper corners of the image are messed up.

Expired 600 film is selling for up to $50 to $60 a pack (10 photos) on eBay these days, even though new Impossible film for 600 cameras costs $24. You can also buy unexpired performance-guaranteed 600 film for about $5 a shot in bulk. Seems like a lot of Polaroid lovers are still snatching up Polaroid film while they still can.

Shooting Instant Photos as Windows into the Real World

If you have an instant camera, have you ever tried taking digital photos of the prints right after you made them? For his series titled “Instax Windows“, Shawn McClung carries around a digital camera and snaps a digital photo of his Fuji Instax prints right after they’re taken, with the scene in the print lined up with the real world.
Read more…

Polaroid and Lady Gaga Launch New Instant Camera, Glasses, and Printer

Looks like the blogosphere was right in December of last year when it guessed that a teaser put out by Polaroid was for a new instant camera launch at CES 2011. The company — along with Creative Director Lady Gaga — officially unveiled the camera today in Las Vegas, and also showed off a new printer and a bizarre pair of glasses as well.
Read more…

Concept Cardboard Pinhole Camera Shoots Instant Photos

The “Flutter in Pinhole” is a beautiful concept camera that combines a cardboard pinhole camera with instant film to make sharing memories a breeze, and could be the high-tech postcard of the future.
Read more…

Put Instant Photos to Creative Practical Use

Here’s a really great way to turn photos from a novelty camera into something of practical use — make the photos into mini magnetic dry erase boards! Photojojo has some nifty ideas and instructions for turning Polaroid or Instax prints into colorful refrigerator magnets, a perpetual photo calendar, reusable magnetic reminder notes, and more.

(via Photojojo)

Fujifilm Instax Camera in B.o.B’s Music Video ‘Airplanes’

Fujifilm’s Instax Mini 7S landed a pretty prominent spot in hip hop artist B.o.B’s music video for “Airplanes,” featuring Hayley Williams. It seems like instant photo marketing is especially seeking exposure through music videos — Lady Gaga’s “Telephones” also contains a hefty 10-second spot for Polaroid’s instant  camera.

The Impossible Project May Not Be Possible After All

After Polaroid announced that it would stop producing instant film in 2008, a group called The Impossible Project acquired the last instant film production facility in the Netherlands in a bid to save the beloved medium. This past weekend, the group ran into “an unexpected problem with one of the components vital for production,” possibly jeopardizing the project.

The group was scheduled to hold an event on February 22nd in New York, where the original instant film was announced 63 years ago, but that has been postponed. In their press release, they state,

On 22nd MARCH 2010 [the project leaders] will disclose whether or not their Impossible Project will be possible.

On behalf of all the Polaroid-enthusiasts who read PetaPixel, we wish The Impossible Project Godspeed!

(via Amateur Photographer)


Update:

Hmmm… The group (@ImpossibleUSA) has tweeted a response to this post, stating that the problem was simply a shipment issue by one of the suppliers. However, if you read the press release on their website, it sounds much more dire than the situation apparently is.