shutterrelease

A DIY Remote Mechanical Cable Release for a Large Format Camera

I do mainly large format photography, and I often take my own self-portrait by using my pneumatic cable release that has a long cable and air bulb release. However, I have long been thinking about how to make a more modern kind of remote cable release. In this article, I will show how I created a DIY remote cable release.

How to Make a DIY Foot Pedal Remote Shutter Release

I have been looking into shooting other sports outside of the motorsport world, and I have been particularly interested in soccer, basketball, and baseball. After doing some research, I found that some sports shooters covering these type of events use different remote trigger setups such as foot pedals and cable release buttons.

These Smartphone Shutter Releases Are Shaped Like Film Rolls and TLR Cameras

Have you ever wished you could remotely control your smartphone’s camera with a trigger remote disguised as a 35mm film canister or a mini twin-lens reflex camera? If so, then your wish has been granted by the Japanese company Gizmon. For a small price, you can pick up one of these cute and colorful gadgets and pair it with your iOS or Android smartphone.

Divoom Bluetune-Bean is a Bluetooth Speaker That Doubles as a Wireless Shutter Release

As smartphone photography and selfie culture become more ubiquitous, we're starting to see new products that aim to make snapping smartphone shots simpler. First came the selfie stick, and now there's a new product called the Divoom Bluetune-Bean. It's an ultra-portable Bluetooth speaker that has a feature that sets it apart: on the side is a shutter button for triggering the camera on your phone.

Fashion a Mold to Cast Your Own Canon Shutter Release Cable Connectors

Here's something that may not be relevant to most of you, but if you enjoy dabbling in do-it-yourself gear hacks you might find it interesting. Milan-based photographer and freelance engineer Andrea Biffi came up with an interesting way of creating a shutter release cable connector for his Canon DSLR. Instead of buying an actual remote and slicing off the plug end, he decided to cast his own out of hard rubber.

How to Capture Water Balloons Popping by Hacking a Shutter Release Cable

Here's a tutorial on how to capture an exploding water balloon in the precise moment the balloon pops, while the water still holds the shape of a balloon. I didn’t want to invest any money in laser barriers or something similar, so I built a very simple mechanism. It doesn't give me perfect timing, but it produces acceptable results.

DIY Wireless Remote Created with a Cable Release and Arduino

I need the ability to wirelessly take photos, but my Fujifilm X100 did not have a conventional shutter release -- it has the old fashioned ”cable” release.

After playing around and buying some cheap cable releases off eBay, I was able to build a working wireless shutter using an Arduino, servo, and a cheap wireless shutter for a Canon DSLR.

Photos of Strangers on a Beach, Captured by the Subjects Themselves

Stranger Tourist Self-Portraits is an experimental photo project by photographer Benoit Paillé that consists of photos of strangers encountered on a beach in Mexico. What's different about the series is that the photographs are captured by the subjects themselves, as evidenced by the remote shutter release cable seen approaching the camera from the strangers' hands.

A Remote Shutter Release for iOS Devices That Masquerades as a Roll of Film

Ever since the launch of iOS 5 in mid-2011, iPhones, iPads, and iPods have accepted the "volume up" signal as a "take a picture" command, allowing Apple's headphones to double as handy remote shutter releases. If triggering your camera's shutter with a pair of earbuds in your hand isn't "hip" enough for you, check out this new iCA Remote Shutter by Japanese novelty photo company Gizmon. It's a dedicated shutter release for your iOS device that's designed to look like a roll of film.

Trigger Happy Turns Your Smartphone Into a Fancy Camera Remote

Trigger Happy is a new product that lets you use your iOS or Android smartphone as a fancy camera remote. It consists of an app and a one-meter-long cable that goes from your phone's audio jack to your camera. Besides acting as a simple remote shutter release for shake-free shots, the app offers bulb functionality for timing long exposures, an intervalometer for timelapse photography, HDR mode, and bramping. They're also working on lightning detection, audio waveform detection, face detection, and accelerometer-based triggering.