matrix

How to Fake the Look of ‘Bullet Time’ Using a Single Camera

Here's a new 3-minute music video by Russian/Ukrainian group 5'Nizza. In it, the band finds themselves in a variety of situations, but as the action is frozen they keep on singing while the camera pans around them. How was it done? It turns out the effect was created with a single moving camera and a green screen.

Fire Breathers Captured in Slow Mo and Bullet Time Using 50 Cameras

In addition to running a giant stock footage archive of over 1,500 4K clips, Philadelphia-based DOP Mitch Martinez also shoots Time Slice, or Matrix-style Bullet Time, footage.

The video above shows slow-motion and bullet-time footage of firebreathers spewing fireballs. It was captured using a rig of 48 DSLRs, a RED Epic, and a Panasonic GH4.

Capturing Bullet Time on Film with 364 Separate Pinhole Cameras

What kind of project would you dedicate six months of your life to? For photographer Brandon Griffiths, the answer was "pinhole bullet time photography." His recently completed project took him a whopping 4382 hours to complete from start to finish.

Using a custom-built rig of 364 pinhole cameras, Griffiths created the video above showing Matrix-style bullet time done completely with analog photography.

Creating 3D Portraits Using an Array of Digital Cameras

Chilean visual artist Felipe Baeza is doing some pretty interesting work with Matrix-style camera rigs. Instead of bullet time videos, Baeza uses his rig to create 3D portraits of subjects that can then be displayed in augmented reality or through a 3D model viewer.

Freezing Time and Space Using a Bullet-Time Rig of 100 Digital Cameras

Last week we shared a guest post by photographer Martin Legeer on how he built a Matrix-style bullet-time camera rig using 50 Canon DSLRs. Shortly afterward, Greek photographer Theodoros Tziatzios of Real Creations sent an email telling us about his own camera rig projects, which use double the number of cameras.

That's right: a camera rig with 100 cameras for extremely smooth 360-degree views of subjects that freeze time and space.

How I Created a Matrix Bullet Time-Style Rig With 50 DSLRs

Back in March, a client for whom I’ve done some light consulting work asked me if it was possible to capture a 360-degree-image that can be rotated afterwards. I said of course, but didn’t think that much about the consequences -- it's a project that would wake me up at nights for the next few months.

Matrix-style Bullet Time Photos Using 20 Polaroid Cameras

Line up an array of digital cameras and you'll have yourself a setup that can take Matrix-style bullet-time shots. Artist Sam Blanchard created a similar rig, but went with Polaroid cameras instead of digital ones. The project, titled Polaroid Matrix, consists of 20 Polaroid cameras arranged in a circle and modified to be triggered remotely. After the cameras are triggered to simultaneously capture photos of the subject in the center, the Polaroid pictures are arranged and turned into a Flipbook.

Line Up Some DSLRs for Matrix-style Bullet Time Video

Here's an idea: find a bunch of photography-lovin' friends, borrow their DSLR cameras, and shoot your own Matrix-style bullet time videos from home! The above video shows a workshop where they were able to bring together 24 cameras for this awesome purpose.