Educational

 

This Image from 1974 is the First Satellite Photo of the Contiguous United States

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What you see above is the first satellite photo of the contiguous 48 states of the United States. It was created in 1972 for NASA by a US agriculture department division, and comprises 595 cloud-free photos captured by NASA’s first Earth Resources Technology Satellite.

All the photos were captured from the same altitude of 560 miles and at the same lighting angle, allowing the images to be seamlessly stitched together into a giant 10×16-foot photo map of the US. You can find a larger version of the image here.

(via Internet Archive via Laughing Squid)

This Photo Zoom Take Us a Billion Times Closer Onto Saturn’s Largest Moon

Ten years ago, on January 14, 2005, NASA landed its Huygens probe onto the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan. To commemorate the event, NASA released the above video that takes us on a 1,000,000,000x journey from a zoomed out photo of Saturn and the moon and into the closest photos captured by Huygens.
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A Closer Look at Nikon’s New Phase Fresnel (PF) Lens Technology

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Weighing just 1.66 pounds, Nikon’s newly announced 300mm f/4 is the world’s lightest 300mm full frame prime autofocus lens. It’s also the first Nikon DSLR lens to feature the company’s new Phase Fresnel (PF) technology, which is the main reason the lens can be so small and lightweight.
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Study Finds that Men Who Share Selfies Online Show More Psychopathic Tendencies

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Men who share selfies online are more likely to exhibit psychopathic tendencies. That’s what researchers are saying after conducting a lengthy study on the link between selfie-taking and certain personality traits.
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Video: The Technologies Inside Canon’s EF Lenses

If you’d like a primer on the technologies found inside Canon’s EF line of lenses, look no further than this 12-minute introduction created by Canon. We learn about things like aspherical lenses, fluorite lenses, diffractive optics, USM, lens coatings, and more.

Canon produced its 100 millionth EF lens back in April of 2014.

(H/T The Digital Picture)

The Most Popular Cameras on Flickr in 2014

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What are the most popular cameras used in the Flickr community? Now that 2014 is in the past, the photo sharing service has done some serious crunching on EXIF data to figure out which cameras were the most popular among its users over the course of the year. Here’s a look into the findings.
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This Picture of Elvis and Nixon is the Most Requested Photo from the US National Archives

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Of all the millions of historical photographs held by the US National Archives, the photo above is the single most requested. It was captured in the Oval Office on December 21, 1970, and shows Elvis Presley meeting then US President Richard Nixon.
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What 100 Million Stars Looks Like: NASA Releases a 1.5 Gigapixel Photo of the Andromeda Galaxy

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NASA has released the largest and sharpest photograph ever made of the Andromeda Galaxy, the nearest spiral galaxy to ours that contains an estimated 1 trillion stars. The new image (above is a crop showing a portion of it) weighs in at 1.5 gigapixels (i.e. 1.5 billion pixels); it’s so big that you would need 600HD televisions to display the entire digital photo.
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Teardown of the Kodak DCS315 Offers an Inside Look at One of the World’s First DSLRs

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Before Canon and Nikon became juggernauts in the world of DSLRs, Kodak actually created one of the first DSLRs by modifying the Nikon Pronea 6i film SLR. Called the Kodak DCS315, the camera was the world’s first DSLR to feature an image preview LCD and JPEG processing in the camera itself. It was launched in 1998 and boasted an amazing (at the time) 1.5 megapixels.
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Chart: The Daily Routines of Famous Creative People Throughout History

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How does your daily schedule compare to the 24-hour routines of some of the most famous creative individuals throughout history? Podio created the chart above using info from the book “Daily Rituals: How Artists Work” by Mason Currey. Though there aren’t any photographers on the list here, it’s an interesting look at how creative minds of the past approached things like work, sleep, and play.

The Daily Routines of Famous Creative People [Podio via Colossal]