Educational

 

external The Invention of the “Snapshot” Changed the Way We Viewed the World —Smithsonian

Not everyone was happy with the rise of the snapshot. Professional photographers were repelled by the weird, ungainly, often out-of-focus shots that amateurs produced. “Photography as a fad is well nigh on its last legs,” prayed the art photographer Alfred Stieglitz. Other pundits bemoaned “Kodak fiends,” camera obsessives who carried their device everywhere and were apparently so constantly taking pictures that they would space out and miss their trains.

 
Aug 31, 2014 · ↬ Via · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

US Spy Satellites Used to Drop Photos in ‘Film Buckets’ from Space for Airplanes to Catch in Mid-Air

So, you think taking your film to the local shop to get developed is a pain? Try being an American spy satellite in the 1960s. Getting your film developed then meant dropping it in a special ‘film bucket’ capsule from space, which the US Air Force then had to catch in mid-air. Read more…

GoPro Rolls Out Field Guide Tutorial Series to Help You Get the Most Out of Your Action Cam

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Really want to get the most out of your new GoPro? You’re in luck, because GoPro recently turned to their own in-house production team and asked them to create a series of tutorials called the GoPro Field Guide.

This collection of videos — made by the same guys who follow some of the top extreme athletes in the world around and film their insane antics — will help you get the hang of that little action cam and really take advantage of everything it can do. Read more…

When You Flip Through an IKEA Catalog, 75% of the ‘Photography’ You See is CGI

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This photo isn’t actually a photo. From the furniture to the beautiful light falling on the countertops and wood floors, what you’re looking at is a CGI rendering that has replaced 75% of the ‘photos’ in the IKEA catalogs the college kids, divorced men and NYC residents in your life have lying around. Read more…

B&H Photo Debuts One of the Most Comprehensive and Useful Canon Lens Guides You’ve Ever Seen

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Earlier today, B&H officially launched a new online resource called the Canon Lens Experience. It’s a dedicated microsite that takes a comprehensive look at the various lenses Canon offers, presenting unique and interactive features that demonstrate the various capabilities.

Even more interesting is the series of interviews which features 15 well-respected photographers from different fields, each of whom talk about their experience as a photographer and how their respective Canon gear have helped them make the iconic shots they’ve captured. Read more…

external Why I Love My Leica —The Guardian

From Henri Cartier-Bresson to Annie Leibovitz, many of the 20th century’s most defining images were shot on a Leica. [The Guardian's] technology columnist, a lifelong fan, tells the story of the camera that almost died and was triumphantly reborn in the digital age.

 
Aug 25, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · 2 Comments »

A Retinal Neuroscientist’s Rebuttal: Why Humans Can’t See Near Infrared, No Matter What They Eat

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One of the more interesting stories we ran across this weekend was an initial update from a small group of scientists who claim to have successfully extended human vision into near infrared. Their data seems to show that they have, indeed, managed to do this simply by altering their subjects’ diet by restricting vitamin A1 and supplementing with A2 in order to create a certain protein complex. You can read more about this here.

The results seem exciting, mind-blowing even. But retinal neuroscientist and photographer Bryan Jones begs to differ, and he has been kind enough to let us reprint his full rebuttal below. Read more…

external Why The Non-Refundable Deposit Is A Myth —DIY Photography

Don’t get caught up in a legal dispute over the wording of your contract like wedding photographer Jeff Guyer. Guyer explains the non-refundable deposit loophole commonly found in photography contracts that can easily leave you vulnerable to flaky clients.

 
Aug 24, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

What Photographers are NOT Considering When Using High ISO

What is it about this picture that 'was' considered along with high ISO?

What is it about this picture that ‘was’ considered along with high ISO?

It’s no secret now that modern cameras have taken photographers to new heights with their ability to shoot at and above ISO 1600. Personally, I can now shoot in situations where previously, I ‘had no choice’ but to use flash or put the camera down, so it’s no surprise many photographers are taking advantage of high ISO to be able to shoot in poor existing light.

The key word here is ‘poor’, so I’ll elaborate. The rule of light is that when a light source is large and close, it is at its softest, but when a subject becomes further away from a light source, the quality of that light deteriorates at a fast pace. So much that it gets to a point where the light ends up looking muddy and horrible, because the contrast ratio of light on the subject compared to the background is almost non-existent. Read more…

Filmmaker Shares Excellent Tips, Techniques and Concepts for All Visual Storytellers

Filmmaker Richard Michalak has spent over 30 years behind the camera, and in the video above by Hugh Fenton he condenses all of that knowledge into a set of tips, techniques and concepts that will prove to be incredibly useful whether or not your interests involve moving pictures. Read more…