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external University of Cambridge Achieves Funding Goal, Saves Antarctic Negatives —Scott Polar Research Institute

The Polar Museum at the Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, is proud to announce that it has successfully raised the £275,000 needed to be able to purchase the 113 photographic negatives, thanks to public support. The negatives represent an extraordinary visual record of Scott’s last expedition, but were in danger of being sold abroad.

 
Visit this link → · Shared on Mar 31, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

A Concise Explanation of How Crop Factor Affects Both Focal Length AND Aperture

Editor’s Note: Due to some issues with the camera, this video is very shaky at times. It didn’t bother us much, but if you’re easily distracted this video might annoy more than it educates you. You’ve been warned.


If you’re just getting into the world of cameras and lenses, the term “crop factor” and phrases like “this is a 35mm equivalent lens” might still confuse you. Well, that shouldn’t be the case much longer.

The video above offers a clear, concise and simple explanation of crop factor that will hopefully clear all of this up and equip you with some important knowledge that will come in handy the next time you’re shopping for a lens or crop sensor body. Read more…

8 Essential Underwater Photography Tips from Sarah Lee

smugmugsarah

Water photographer Sarah Lee (recently featured in a behind-the-scenes artist profile for the SmugMug Film series) grew up in Hawaii, surfing and swimming competitively. One day, while at a swimming competition, she was handed a camera and hasn’t looked back since.

She finds inspiration in the unpredictability of nature, creates art that captures the interplay of people, water, and light, and uses photography to find beauty in the chaos. If you want to take the plunge into underwater photography, check out Sarah Lee’s essential underwater photography tips below, plus get a close look at her underwater photography gear kit. Read more…

Breaking Down How Tilt-Shift Works and How To Use It for Focus Control

From Jay P. Morgan of The Slanted Lens comes an educational and behind the scenes video out of Yanks Air Museum in Chino, California. Throughout the video, Morgan gives insight into the process of using a tilt-shift lens and shares some nice background information on how a tilt-shift lens actually works. Read more…

Some Intriguing Trivia Tidbits on Shooting ‘The Shining’

Danny Steadicam Low Shot

There is little doubt that auteur Stanley Kubrick looms large as a director able to distinctively bring his films to life through his vision. He has left his mark across the motion picture landscape.

He also happens to be responsible for some very interesting technical results in the realm of photography as well (including owning 3 of the 10 Carl Zeiss Planar 50mm f/0.7 ever made).

Any words I write here about him will pale in comparison to the reams of scholarly works already published. And so, instead, I give you a couple of fascinating pieces of Shining/Kubrick trivia that you can whip out the next time there’s a lull in conversation. Read more…

What Would the World Look Like If the Air Were Truly Transparent?

We could shoot astrophotos as clear as Hubble's 24-hours per day... if we weren't all dead.

Josh Velson · Mar 17, 2014 · 5 Comments » ·

external “Beyond Cartier-Bresson: A History of a Master’s Early Work” —TIME LightBox

The primary (but hardly the sole) merit of this extraordinary Cartier-Bresson retrospective is that it sheds light on little-known aspects of his career. Too often Cartier-Bresson has been represented only as the artist of the “decisive moment,” as if his vision had emerged fully developed in one burst, and remained constant throughout his career. The reality, of course, is much more complex.

 
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external “The Day Albert Einstein Died: A Photographer’s Story” —LIFE

Albert Einstein, whose theories exploded and reshaped our ideas of how the universe works, died on April 18, 1955, of heart failure. He was 76. His funeral and cremation were intensely private affairs, and only one photographer managed to capture the events of that extraordinary day: LIFE magazine’s Ralph Morse.

Armed with his camera and a case of scotch — to open doors and loosen tongues — Morse compiled a quietly intense record of a 20th-century icon’s passing. But aside from one now-famous image — of Einstein’s office, exactly as he left it, taken hours after his death — the pictures Morse took that day were never published. At the request of Einstein’s son, who asked that the family’s privacy be respected while they mourned, LIFE’s editors chose not to run the full story, and for more than five decades Morse’s photographs lay in the magazine’s archives, forgotten.

 
Visit this link → · Shared on Mar 15, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

A Thorough Video Guide to Using a GoPro with a Quadcopter

Back at the GoPro goodies again is none other than Mitch Bergsma, most recently featured on PetaPixel for his tip on how to stabilize hand-held GoPro footage using your face. This time though, the tutorial attempts to help those interested in using a DJI Phantom with their GoPro attached to it. Read more…