Educational

 

How I Got The Shot: Blood Moon at Antelope Island

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All too often, people ask me to put my camera down and join the party. I get that stink eye on many occasions when I plop myself in the corner of a campsite, drag my cooler within reaching distance, and point my camera towards the night sky. Friends wouldn’t notice at first, but then start to realize that they were missing someone around the fire ring. “Where did Nick go?” I could hear people snarkily asking, like I was off doing something more interesting than they were.

Don’t get me wrong, I love a good laugh around the fire pit but when you’re camping and the sky is screaming at you, it’s time to leave those revolving conversations and break out the camera gear. Read more…

This Adams Retouching Machine Helped Old School ‘Photoshoppers’ Touch Up Negatives by Hand

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Last week we shared an example of beauty retouching that was done by hand in the early 1900s. If you’re wondering how this type of retouching was done, check out the contraption above.

It’s called the Adams Retouching Machine, and was created to aid negative retouchers in doing manual edits more quickly and cleanly.
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Beauty Retouching from the Early 1900s: A Portrait of Actress Joan Crawford That’s ‘Photoshopped’

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Want to see an early example of beauty retouching in photography? Here’s one. The side-by-side images above from the early 1930s show what a glamour portrait looked like before and after manual ‘Photoshopping.’
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How to Photograph the Moon (Part 1)

The "Blood Moon" taken October 8, 2014

Ever since I’ve owned a camera I’ve wanted to take photos of the night sky. When I first got a DSLR camera 5 or so years ago I thought getting decent shots wasn’t very likely with the inexpensive gear I had and it was something best left to the pros. It was only after I became comfortable with the manual mode on my camera that I realized that shooting at night was completely doable. Read more…

Simple GIF Shows How Stopping Down the Aperture Affects Depth of Field

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Here’s a simple little GIF that can come in handy the next time you’re asked to explain how aperture and depth of field work. Created by Reddit user veedees, it shows exactly how stopping down your lens from f/1.8 all the way to f/16 translates into different depths of field. Read more…

Advice on Dealing with Heat Wave Distortion When You’re Shooting With a Long Lens

Those of you who own long lenses might want to give this five-and-a-half minute video a watch. In it, wildlife and nature photographer Steve Perry breaks down what heat wave distortion is, how it can affect your images, and offers a few tips if you want to ensure your images stay as sharp as possible.

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Nikon D750 Review: Nikon… You’ve Created a Monster

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This Nikon D750 Review by Ross Harvey was originally published on his blog, and is being reprinted in full with permission.


What this review isn’t: pixel peeping and statistical comparisons between various cameras.

What this review is: a real world account in a professional environment from a gear lover with high standards. It’s not intended to be a catch-all review, it’s specifically tailored for my own needs and shooting style.

Important notes: 1) These cameras were paid for by myself, it’s an unbiased review. 2) I have used and compared gear from many other brands. They didn’t hit the spot and hence not adopted professionally. 3) Every shot (except dance floor) is ambient/available light. No flash whatsoever. Read more…

The Dunning-Kruger Peak of Photography

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This humorous graphic was created by Lee Hutchinson over at Ars Technica in a recent article comparing the iPhone 6 Plus to a Canon DSLR. It suggests that people who are just starting out in photography commonly experience a period of delusion in which they suddenly think they are much greater at photography than they actually are.
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The Math Behind the Rolling Shutter Phenomenon

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I remember seeing the photo above on Flickr once, and having my brain melt slightly from trying to figure out what went wrong.

The issue was the propeller was rotating as the camera detector ‘read out’, i.e. there was some motion during the exposure of the camera. This is an interesting thing to think about, lets have a look.
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Video: Nikon Strips Away the Outer Shell and Shows You the Tech Inside Its Nikkor Lenses

Ever wonder how the tech packed inside of your new Nikon lens actually works? How does Vibration Reduction provide 4.5 stops of stabilization? And what about the silent motors, how do those work?

In a video released earlier today, Nikon Asia decided to peel away the outer shell of its glass and show you, revealing the technology that makes a Nikkor Lens a Nikkor.

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