Posts Tagged ‘psa’

Overhead Bin Full? Pull Out Your Camera Prior to Checking In Your Bag

When overhead bins on airplanes fill up, flight attendants will often ask passengers to gate-check their carry-on bags. If this happens to you, be sure you take out your camera gear out of your bag prior to handing it over to the attendant. It’s not just for peace of mind in knowing that your gear isn’t being thrown around and abused: major airlines generally have provisions in their contracts that keep them from being held responsible for electronics in checked bags. If the camera is damaged or stolen, you might be out of luck.
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Beware Craigslist Scammers Hunting for Gullible Wedding Photographers

If you’re a photographer looking for a gig on Craigslist, be careful. As with virtually all the types of “help wanted” listings found on the site, requests for photography services are often used by scammers as a way of luring the naive. Scammers also regularly send out emails to photographers advertising their services.
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Terrorism Prevention Video Asks Public to Report Photographers to Police

One of the common reasons given for being wary of photographers is that terrorists commonly use cameras as part of their information gathering tactics prior to devastating attacks.

The disconcerting video above is a terrorist prevention video that was funded by the Department of Homeland security and uploaded to Houston’s city website back in January 2011. Starting at 1:42, it attempts to convince people that photographers may be potential terrorists, and that the police should be called if one appears to “hang around for no apparent reason.”
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Internet Scam Warning! Kickstarter Used to Fund Useless Projects

The Onion’s Tech Trends has a hilarious satirical video warning of the “insidious” Internet scams through Kickstarter: bad projects that guilt people into donating in order to fulfill a life-long dream:

Internet criminals are using a website called “Kickstarter” to bilk friends and families out of money for terrible, ill-conceived, and unnecessary “personal projects.”

If you’ve been following this blog for a while, you know that we regularly feature photography-related projects that pop up on Kickstarter. Sorry about that.

The Onion (via A Photo Editor)

PSA: Beware Vertical Video Syndrome

This video points to a pretty horrific, disturbing future if the scourge known as Vertical Video Syndrome — VVS for short — isn’t tackled head on. So we thought we’d do our part by sharing this PSA. And remember, if you see someone who suffers from VVS, just say: “You’re not shooting that right dummy!”

(via TogTech)

Reminder: Change the Clocks in Your Cameras for DST

Daylight saving time started this past Sunday. Unless you’ve been operating an hour off from those around you, you probably remembered to change the clocks around your home and in your car… but did you remember to change the clock in your camera?


Image credit: Reminded by kayakeverywhere

Think the Giottos Rocket Blower Looks Like a Bomb? The TSA Does Too

The Giottos Rocket is a popular tool used by photographers to remove dust from cameras and glass, but if you’re in love with yours, you might want to think twice about flying with it. Reddit user gynoceros found out the hard way that some TSA airport screeners aren’t too enthusiastic about the Rocket’s shape. He writes,

FYI — If you attempt to fly with a Giottos Rocket Blower (you know, rubber bulb you squeeze to force air down a nozzle to blow dust off your sensor — no metal, no moving parts), the TSA may confiscate it because it “looks like a bomb”, no questions asked.

Just f**king happened to me in Newark. I knew I’d get robbed in Newark one day.

To be fair, it does have an uncanny resemblance to “Fat Man“…


Image credit: Rocket Power by Adam Mulligan

Beware Fake Camera Gear, Even When Buying from Amazon.com

Photographer Lee Morris recently purchased a Nikon MB-D11 battery grip from Amazon.com for $216. It worked perfectly fine, but after Morris purchased a second grip for a wedding, he noticed something was different about the first one. After some investigation, he came to realize that he had purchased a Nikon-branded version (i.e. counterfeit) of a grip that ordinarily sells for $40 on Amazon.

Even if you’re buying directly from Amazon.com, verifying that the product is being fulfilled by a reputable dealer can reduce the chances of you unwittingly buying something fake.

Thieves Stealing Camera Lenses from Around Photographers’ Necks

The next time you’re walking around with a DSLR around your neck and a stranger asks you for directions, you might want to keep a hand on your lens. Yesterday BBC’s “The Real Hustle” included a short segment in which they demonstrated how easy it is to steal a lens on the street. The con artists simply detach and pocket the camera lens of an unsuspecting photographer while pretending to ask for directions. Apparently this is a real con that thieves are using these days…

(via Pixiq)

Be Careful When Storing Your Camera Gear in Hotel Room Safes

Here’s another public service announcement for those of you who travel often (see our warning on zippered bags): the safes in hotel rooms may not be as secure as you think. YouTube user skyrangerpro recently discovered that the safe in his room could be opened with “000000” regardless of what passcode he chose. This is presumably the “master password” the hotel uses when you’ve forgotten the one you’ve chosen, but the fact that some hotels leave this on factory default settings is cause for concern.

The next time you think about leaving some pricey camera gear in a hotel safe, makes sure all zeros isn’t a working passcode.

(via Reddit)