Posts Tagged ‘psa’

Internet Scam Warning! Kickstarter Used to Fund Useless Projects

The Onion’s Tech Trends has a hilarious satirical video warning of the “insidious” Internet scams through Kickstarter: bad projects that guilt people into donating in order to fulfill a life-long dream:

Internet criminals are using a website called “Kickstarter” to bilk friends and families out of money for terrible, ill-conceived, and unnecessary “personal projects.”

If you’ve been following this blog for a while, you know that we regularly feature photography-related projects that pop up on Kickstarter. Sorry about that.

The Onion (via A Photo Editor)

PSA: Beware Vertical Video Syndrome

This video points to a pretty horrific, disturbing future if the scourge known as Vertical Video Syndrome — VVS for short — isn’t tackled head on. So we thought we’d do our part by sharing this PSA. And remember, if you see someone who suffers from VVS, just say: “You’re not shooting that right dummy!”

(via TogTech)

Reminder: Change the Clocks in Your Cameras for DST

Daylight saving time started this past Sunday. Unless you’ve been operating an hour off from those around you, you probably remembered to change the clocks around your home and in your car… but did you remember to change the clock in your camera?


Image credit: Reminded by kayakeverywhere

Think the Giottos Rocket Blower Looks Like a Bomb? The TSA Does Too

The Giottos Rocket is a popular tool used by photographers to remove dust from cameras and glass, but if you’re in love with yours, you might want to think twice about flying with it. Reddit user gynoceros found out the hard way that some TSA airport screeners aren’t too enthusiastic about the Rocket’s shape. He writes,

FYI — If you attempt to fly with a Giottos Rocket Blower (you know, rubber bulb you squeeze to force air down a nozzle to blow dust off your sensor — no metal, no moving parts), the TSA may confiscate it because it “looks like a bomb”, no questions asked.

Just f**king happened to me in Newark. I knew I’d get robbed in Newark one day.

To be fair, it does have an uncanny resemblance to “Fat Man“…


Image credit: Rocket Power by Adam Mulligan

Beware Fake Camera Gear, Even When Buying from Amazon.com

Photographer Lee Morris recently purchased a Nikon MB-D11 battery grip from Amazon.com for $216. It worked perfectly fine, but after Morris purchased a second grip for a wedding, he noticed something was different about the first one. After some investigation, he came to realize that he had purchased a Nikon-branded version (i.e. counterfeit) of a grip that ordinarily sells for $40 on Amazon.

Even if you’re buying directly from Amazon.com, verifying that the product is being fulfilled by a reputable dealer can reduce the chances of you unwittingly buying something fake.

Thieves Stealing Camera Lenses from Around Photographers’ Necks

The next time you’re walking around with a DSLR around your neck and a stranger asks you for directions, you might want to keep a hand on your lens. Yesterday BBC’s “The Real Hustle” included a short segment in which they demonstrated how easy it is to steal a lens on the street. The con artists simply detach and pocket the camera lens of an unsuspecting photographer while pretending to ask for directions. Apparently this is a real con that thieves are using these days…

(via Pixiq)

Be Careful When Storing Your Camera Gear in Hotel Room Safes

Here’s another public service announcement for those of you who travel often (see our warning on zippered bags): the safes in hotel rooms may not be as secure as you think. YouTube user skyrangerpro recently discovered that the safe in his room could be opened with “000000” regardless of what passcode he chose. This is presumably the “master password” the hotel uses when you’ve forgotten the one you’ve chosen, but the fact that some hotels leave this on factory default settings is cause for concern.

The next time you think about leaving some pricey camera gear in a hotel safe, makes sure all zeros isn’t a working passcode.

(via Reddit)

Are Film Canisters Safe for Storing Food?

A neat way to reuse film canisters is to poke holes in the lids and turn them into salt shakers, but some people argue that this may expose you to the harmful chemicals that leak out of film and into the plastic of the canister. It’s actually a question that Kodak has received a lot over the years, and they say it shouldn’t be a problem as long as you wash it out first:

To protect the film from contamination, Kodak quality standards require that the insides of the containers must be exceptionally clean. No “toxic” materials leach out or offgas from the containers themselves.

[…] Newspaper and magazine articles have mentioned “toxic residues” in the containers which might come from the film. There are none. The chemicals in a roll of film are embedded in the gelatin emulsion layers (about as thick as a human hair) and do not rub off the plastic film base.

[…] In summary: There are no “toxic residues” in Kodak film containers […] if a customer chooses to use a Kodak film container for other than film storage, the container first should be thoroughly washed with soap and water.

They also state that if you (or your pet) accidentally eat some film itself, the main concern would be the film cutting your innards rather than chemical poisoning.

35mm Film Containers [Kodak]

Digital Cameras Hazardous to Health?

Mother Jones reports that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is cracking down on glymes — chemicals linked to health problems that can be found in many products we regularly come in contact with, including digital cameras:

Did you print a piece of paper today? Or use a digital camera? If so, it could have exposed you to glymes, a clear liquid class of chemicals used as solvents in printer ink, carpet cleaners and other household products. For a decade, the EPA has known about studies that link glymes to health problems including miscarriages, developmental damage, and gene mutation. And yet only now is the agency beginning to regulate them. This July, the EPA announced that it plans to clamp down on glymes, which may join the ranks of the 360 chemicals subject to the EPA’s “significant new use rule.” This means that any time a company wants to use glymes, it would have to ask the EPA first.

This Mystery Chemical Could Cause You To Miscarry [Mother Jones]


Image credit: point & shoot by quapan

Remember There Are Real People on the Other Side of Those Pixels

When viewing other people’s photographs online, more often than not there’s a way to comment and share your thoughts. While photo-sharing sites seem to have nicer commenters than a site like YouTube, there are still plenty of people who seem intent on putting people down and filling the Interwebs with vitriol. If that’s you, then here’s a video you definitely need to see.

It’s an excerpt from the same book as another awesome video we shared a while back, “What’s obvious to you may be amazing to others.”

(via Reddit)