Posts Tagged ‘history’

The Revolutionary War Veterans Who Lived Long Enough to Have Their Pictures Taken

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The Revolutionary War ended in 1783 and photography was invented in the 1820s and 1830s, so most of the veterans of the war didn’t live long enough to have their portraits made. A handful of them did.
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The Original Selfie Stick Was Invented in the 1980s

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Did you know that the selfie stick was actually invented back in the 1980s? The concept didn’t take off until Bluetooth-enabled smartphone cameras in recent years, but the concept has been around for decades now.
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These Animated GIFs Show the Evolution of Cameras Through History

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How have the designs of cameras changed over the past 100 years? The team over at eBay Deals wants to show you. They’ve created a series of animated GIFs showing how the cameras produced by major brands have evolved over the years as styles and technologies changed.
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Old Film Roll from eBay Reveals Photos of Korea from Half a Century Ago

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Photographer Ben Larsen purchased a lot on eBay that included several old rolls of film, one of which was a roll of Kodak Plus-X Pan black and white 35mm film. Not knowing anything about the roll, Larsen tossed it into a tank while processing his own roll of Kodak Tri-X at home. To his surprise, the film emerged from the developer with a large number of old photos of Seoul, South Korea, from five decades ago.
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The Earliest Known Photos of People Smiling

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The following is a collection of some of the earliest known images of people smiling, starting with a pair of soldiers in the Mexican American War in 1847 and up to a group of soldiers near the end of the Civil War.

If early images of people smiling do not come as a surprise to you, there are a few things to note. Among other things, a portrait of a person with a grin of any kind is quite a rare find in the early decades of photography.
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How an Unknown Photographer Named Carleton E. Watkins Helped Save Yosemite

Did you know that a single unknown photographer helped change the course of history for Yosemite with his photos back in 1861? The video above tells the story of Carleton Watkins, a man whose photos of Yosemite made their way to President Abraham Lincoln and helped influence the decision to turn the area into a National Park.
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The First Photo of an Execution by Electric Chair

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The photograph above has been called the most famous tabloid photo of the 1920s. It’s the first photo showing an execution by electric chair, and was captured by photographer Tom Howard at the execution of Ruth Snyder back on January 12, 1928.
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This is What the History of Camera Sales Looks Like with Smartphones Included

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A few months ago, we shared a chart showing how sales the camera market have changed between 1947 and 2014. The data shows that after a large spike in the late 2000s, the sales of dedicated cameras have been shrinking by double digit figures each of the following years. Mix in data for smartphone sales, and the chart can shed some more light on the state of the industry.
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The Worlds First Hyperlapse, Shot in 1995 on a Bolex 16mm Film Camera

Hyperlapses, or timelapses with the camera traveling great distances, have become all the rage these days, but have you ever wondered how far back the technique goes? The short film above, titled “Pacer,” was captured back in 1995 using a Bolex 16mm film camera. It is being called the world’s oldest hyperlapse.
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How Astrophotography Has Improved Over the Past 135 Years

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Want to see how much our ability to photograph space has improved over the past 135 years or so? Just check out the side-by-side comparison above. On the left is a photo of Jupiter from back in 1879 as it appeared in the book “A History of Astronomy in the 19th Century” by Agnes Clerk. On the right is a photo NASA shot in 2014.

What’s more, amateur astrophotographers can now capture photos of Jupiter and moon transit events from their own backyard using ordinary consumer cameras and smartphones.

(via Universe Today via Reddit)