Posts Tagged ‘famous’

“How Unprofessional Can It Really Be?”: Eisenstaedt’s Self-Portraits with Icons

Best known for his iconic V-J Day in Times Square image, photojournalist Alfred Eisenstaedt snapped some of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century’s most famous faces. LIFE writes that the photographer had an interesting habit: jumping into the frame for self-portraits with his subjects.
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What Famous Photos Would Look Like if Their Photogs Used Ugly Watermarks

Watermarks are commonly used by photographers these days to protect their work from unauthorized use and distribution. However, they’re not very popular among photo viewers, since they do a lot to detract from the content of the photographs. Photographer Kip Praslowicz was thinking about this earlier this week, and writes,

[...] it seems like many amateur [photographers] spend more time putting elaborate watermarks on their images than they do making images worth stealing [...] I don’t really recall ever seeing the photographs of famous art photographers with a gaudy watermark.

He then decided to see what famous photographs would look like if the photographers behind them had slapped obnoxious watermarks onto them.
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Men at Lunch: A Documentary About One of the Most Iconic Photos Taken in NYC

Men at Lunch is an amazing new documentary film by Seán Ó Cualáin that explores the story of one of the most iconic photographs of the 20th century: Lunch atop a Skyscraper. the 1932 photo of eleven construction workers taking a lunch break while sitting on a girder suspended 850 feet above New York City.
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116 Hollywood Stars in One Group Picture

To celebrate its 100th year anniversary, Paramount Pictures gathered together 116 of Hollywood’s most famous stars for an epic group picture. Photographer Art Streiber used 57 strobes to light the scene, and spent just under 6 minutes snapping 63 frames using a Hasselblad H2 and 150mm lens.
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Portraits of Famous People Shot Using Various Photographic Techniques

Washington DC-based photographer Sam Hurd has a series titled “Epic Portraits” that consists of portraits of famous individuals captured using techniques such as the Brenizer method, freelensing, and compositing. What’s neat is that each photograph has its own behind-the-scenes page detailing how it was created (the gear, goal, vision, story, and lesson learned).
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Abstract Images of Famous Landmarks Created by Blending Snapshots

“The Collective Snapshot” is a series by Spanish photographer Pep Ventosa (previously featured here) that consists of abstract images of famous landmarks created by blending together dozens of ordinary snapshots. His goal is to “create an abstraction of the places we’ve been an the things we’ve seen”, and to create images that are both familiar and foreign at the same time.
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Photos of Famous People With Cameras

Celebrity Camera Club is a collection of photos taken of famous people taking photos.

(via tokyo camera style)

An Interview with Henri Cartier-Bresson, the Father of Photojournalism

A wonderful hour-long interview with Henri Cartier-Bresson.

(via Erik Kim)

A Glimpse Behind the Gare St. Lazare in Google Street View

If you go to Google Street View and type in “rue de londres, paris“, you can visit the location where photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson captured his famous street photograph Behind the Gare St. Lazare in 1932. It’s an ordinary location that became an iconic photograph through Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment” style of photography. Cartier-Bresson notes,

There was a plank fence around some repairs behind the Gare Saint Lazare train station. I happened to be peeking through a gap in the fence with my camera at the moment the man jumped. The space between the planks was not entirely wide enough for my lens, which is the reason why the picture is cut off on the left.

If you know of any other iconic photo locations that can be revisited through Google Street View, leave a comment!

rue de londres, paris” in Google Maps (via Erik Kim)

Guy Photoshops Celebs Into His Annual Holiday Party Photos

Every year, graphic designer Everett Hiller and his wife throw a party during the holiday season. Afterwards, Hiller Photoshops the photographs captured at the gathering before sending them out to friends and family. He doesn’t just fix white balance and removed red eye, but instead sneakily Photoshops various celebrities into the shots. Hiller finds source images of celebrities by doing a search on Google Images for the name — ranging from presidents to movie stars — and uses certain keywords (e.g. “dinner” or “I met”) to find candid/amateur shots. Photoshopping the celebs into the photos takes about 45 minutes to do.
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