PetaPixel

external Could a “Hybrid 3D” Trifocal Camera Be on the Way to Hollywood? —The Hollywood Reporter

The system uses a camera rig that holds three cameras: a main camera, the Arri Alexa; and two small cameras used to capture depth information. The goal is to allow the filmmakers to focus on the 2D shoot, and make depth decisions at a later time.

 
Sep 14, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Flipping Photographs Upside Down Turns Ordinary Portraits into Strange Alien Faces

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Self-help author Wayne Dyer once wrote that, “If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” Photographer Anelia Loubser of Cape Town, South Africa used this quote as the basis for her project titled “Alienation.

The series consists of contrasty portraits that have been flipped upside down, turning the ordinary faces into strange, alien mugs.
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Apple Uses Careful Camera Angles and Clever Forced Perspective to Preach Seeing Differently

As part of its latest wave of marketing following the unveiling of the iPhone 6 and Watch, Apple has released a creative video advertisement that uses careful camera angles and forced perspective to tell its very Jobs-esque story.

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external With 200,000 Users, Lightroom Mobile Finds a Foothold —CNET

“The 200,000 customers so far have used Lightroom Mobile to store more than 100 million images, which averages to 500 per person — a solid foothold.”

 
Sep 14, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Can You Spot a Fake Smile in a Photograph?

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“Smile” is a common command uttered before pressing the shutter and snapping a photo, but it’s not always a real smile that gets captured in the resulting portrait. How well can you distinguish a “real” smile from a “fake” one in a picture?

In the two portraits above, which one is a genuine smile, and which one is more forced?
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Why I’ll Photoshop Your Face and Why I Believe It’s Okay

lorde

Last Spring, Lorde Tweeted the photo above and wrote, “i find this curious – two photos from today, one edited so my skin is perfect and one real. remember flaws are ok :-)”

It is admirable, and perhaps even courageous, that Lorde broadcasted this to the masses. There is a lot of debate on the ethics of Photoshopping models and celebrities. A lot of people feel that it pushes unrealistic expectations of beauty in society and sets people up to feel insecure about having imperfections that even the rich and famous share with them.

I totally sympathize with this point of view, but there is another side to the argument that is easily lost on people who aren’t in creative and media fields. There are commercial and artistic forces at work that will never relent and, unless there is a major aesthetic shift in the industry, Photoshopping blemishes is here to stay.
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Researchers Create Software Capable of Intelligently Averaging Thousands of Photos Into One

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Researchers at UC Berkeley have created software that automatically averages hundreds or thousands of similar images to create the pinnacle of amalgamations.

Unveiled last month, AverageExplorer lets users see the average image that represents whatever collection of images they’re looking at. The idea is to break down the overwhelming amount of images given when searching through Google Images, Flickr or Bing and combining it into one visual summary of the result.
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Leaked Photos and Specs of the Samsung NX1 Mirrorless Camera

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Samsung will reportedly be announcing a new NX mirrorless camera tomorrow at Photokina, but photos and specs have already made their way onto the Web. The Samsung NX1 is set to become the company’s new top-of-the-line mirrorless model.
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external 24 Things Photographers Say (And What They Really Mean) —DIYPhotography

“I’m a natural light photographer” translates to “I never actually learned how to work with strobes and artificial light.”

 
Sep 14, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Wedding Photo Found at Ground Zero After 9/11 Finally Returned to Owner After 13 Years

Wedding911Found

For the past thirteen years, Elizabeth Keefe has sought to find the mystery couple in a wedding photograph she happened upon.

The photograph, which depicts a smiling bride and groom with four of their wedding guests, was given to Keefe by a friend who had found it at Ground Zero weeks after the 9/11 attack.
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