photoessay

The Remains Of Stalin’s Dead Road

In Russia’s arctic wilderness, the remnants of one of the Soviet Union’s most tragic gulag projects now lies largely forgotten.

My Photos of Kyrgyzstan, The Hidden Gem of Central Asia

I just returned from 3 weeks in Kyrgyzstan. As a landscape photographer, I have traveled to lots of countries in the world so I guess I can say I am ‘used’ to beautiful landscapes. Until recently, however, Central Asia was unknown territory for me.

The Man From Another Dimension

It was an early Tuesday morning, and I was sitting in a car with a friend of mine. We were going over some papers for a project I had in mind. While my friend had his eyes buried in the papers and text, mine started to wander outside.

A Black and White Comparison: What Does Retouching Tell Us About Photojournalism?

This week, TIME magazine published James Nachtwey’s photo essay on the opioid crisis. Over his decades-long career, Nachtwey has carved out a reputation as a stoic and relentless documentarian of conflict and pain. His latest effort took over a year to produce, and it has all the hallmarks of great photojournalism, providing a level of intimacy and rawness that can only be captured with persistence and skill.

Photos of the Cuban National Circus

Some people run away to Cuba for the sunshine. Some people run away to Cuba for the rum. And some just run away with the circus.

Tombo’s Wound: Portraits of a Sierra Leone Village Without Clean Water

Unity over adversity. It’s a running theme in the story of Tombohuaun, translation “Tombo’s Wound,” a remote village tucked into the jungle of Sierra Leone’s Eastern Province. The community’s founding legend states that a villager named Tombo cut his foot on a catfish in the river, and the then chief ordered the fish to be caught and killed. Back then, as now, the community came together to put things right: they caught the fish, ate it, and went on to name the town after this symbolic triumph.

Out West: A Visual Narrative of China’s Westernmost Region

Borrowing from romanticized notions of the American frontier, synonymous with ideals of exploration and expansion, I captured a visual narrative of China’s westernmost region, Xinjiang. Whereas the American West conjures images of cowboys and pioneers, of manifest destiny and individualistic freedom, the Chinese West has not yet been so defined.

What My Camera Saw as My Parents Died of Cancer

There is a whole range of feelings that happen with the delivery of bad news. In my case, like many others, knees lock, the heart speeds up and the hairs on my arms get a funny little tingle. My circumstances, however, were a little less expected.

Photographing Hang Son Doong, the World’s Largest Cave, by Gregg Jaden

In 2009, I was involved in a near fatal car crash when an oncoming car made an unsafe left turn in front of my vehicle, nearly killing me. This life changing incident was a blessing. It forced me to slow down and really assess how I was living and experiencing my life. This near-death experience revealed to me the need to be creative on a much higher level and really contribute to this planet.

Photographing the ‘Great Migration’ in Tanzania

Tanzania is one of the best places in the world to see nature and wildlife as it has been for thousands of years. The 947,303 square kilometer country holds some of the most famous national parks and nature reserves in the world with diverse landscapes and dense population of wildlife like the Serengeti and Ngorongoro crater.

The Boys Who Grew Breasts: Portraits of the Effects of Risperdal

Johnson & Johnson has been fined over $3 billion for marketing the antipsychotic drug Risperdal to children. Over 18,000 boys and young men are now suing the company over a side effect of the drug called gynecomastia, which causes adolescent boys to develop female breasts. Photographer Richard Johnson recently completed a photo project to tell the boys' stories: it's titled Risperdal Boys.

Vertical Horizon: Pointing the Camera Up in a Dense Urban Jungle

When I arrived in Hong Kong in 2009, I was not much of a photographer; my creative impulses were channelled largely toward drawing and graphic design. However, after living in the middle of this city, soaking in its dense web of streets and an atmosphere that is somehow thick with vibrancy, my view of photography started to evolve.

Photo Essay: The Homeless Children on the Streets of Kitale, Kenya

It's five o’clock in the morning, and a cold mist lies upon the small Kenyan town of Kitale. Only if you walk around the empty town at the break of dawn will you notice the part of life that society is hiding. On cold, concrete floors, all over the city, lie hundreds of children fast asleep.

My Dad’s Chair

My parents bought this chair and a matching couch not long after they were married in 1951. This was my dad’s chair. If you were sitting in it when he walked into the room he gave you the friendly thumb twist, which simply meant: get up.