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Why 365 Photo Projects Are a Waste of Time

There are 365 ways to waste your time being busy instead of doing useful work. One of those is the popular concept of a 365 photo project. Let’s dive in and see why it is one of the best ways to waste your time.

Berlin in Quarantine: A Window View

You can say that our lives are affected by two significant components: space and time. This can be seen as a cliché from the physics books or in practice in our daily lives, the space in which we live and alongside it the time that passes in that space.

How I Succeeded at Doing a 365 Photo Project

Three years ago, I attempted a 365 Project. About 90 days in, I had to accept the fact that I wasn’t going to make it to 365 days, so I turned it into a 100 Day Project. I know that a 365 Project sounds pretty simple -- take and post one photograph each day. My standards for the images I post on my social media are very high, but in the end, I had to accept the reality that I wasn’t going to strike gold each day. I really did try though.

The Fallacy of Photo-a-day Projects

At the turn of the millennium, veteran photojournalist David Hume Kennerly embarked on a project using a single camera outfitted with a single lens – a medium format Mamiya 7II with a 43mm f/4.5 lens. As he crisscrossed the country, he committed to taking a photo each day, which culminated in his book Photo du Jour.

In Our Time: A Year of Shooting Exactly One Film Photo Per Day

At the end of every year, I get to see, for the first time, all the things I’ve already seen. New Year’s Eve is my final film pickup day for One Second, an ongoing project in which I, an otherwise sane, rational, working modern photographer, make one photograph, and only one photograph, on film, every day, with no do-overs and no second chances.

I Shot Exactly One Film Photo Every Day for a Year

No matter how it looks, this is the story of the photographs I didn't make this year. On January 1st, 2018 my colleague, the military photojournalist C.S. Muncy, presented me with a gift: a small, handmade box he'd crafted out of salvaged wood. Muncy, a film lover, had given to me, an unquestioning digital-age professional, a box full of 35mm film.

This Guy Shot a Selfie a Day from Age 12 to His Wedding Day

Here's a 2.5-minute video by Hugo Cornellier, who has captured a selfie every day of his life from when he was 12 years old up until his recent wedding. The video starts in February 2008 and ends when Cornellier tied the knot in August 2017 -- a span documented by over 2,500 photos.

A Rebuttal, or: How to Succeed at Your 365 Project

The hardest part of a 365 project is the first week. Actually, maybe it’s the first two-three weeks. It’s the period between introducing something new into your life and then making that thing a habit.

How to Fail at Your ‘One Photo a Day’ Project

"365 Days of Photos," "One Photo a Day," "One Shot, One Day," "365 Challenge" – Do these sound familiar to you? Have you ever wanted to take at least one photo a day, every day... and I mean Every. Single. Day?

The Art of the Portrait: My Journey to 100 Portraits in 100 Days

As a junior in high school in 1997, when I was deciding which path I wanted to go down, fine arts or photography, things were pretty simple. Did I want to express myself with a camera or a pencil? Inspired by masters like Annie Leibovitz and David LaChapelle, I opted for the camera.

All I wanted to do was create beautiful images for a living. By signing up for a degree in fine art photography, little did I know what lay ahead for me.

A Selfie a Day Keeps the Doctor Away: Creative Studio Self-Portraits by Mike Mellia

Mike Mellia is an advertising and fine art photographer based in New York City. Over the past year, he has been working on a project titled "A Selfie a Day Keeps the Doctor Away." It's an ongoing series of self-portraits captured in a studio and shared through Instagram.

Mellia poses as a wide range of fictional personas and includes clever and humorous captions to go along with each image. He says the photo above shows "that one time an affluent divorcee invited me to clean her pool."

This Guy’s ‘Selfie a Day’ Project Spans 8 Years and is a Creative Stop Motion Video

"One selfie per day" projects require a great deal of commitment but aren't exactly novel these days -- everyone and their mother seems to have hopped onboard the bandwagon after Noah Kalina's everyday project went viral.

Still, there are still the select few that stand out from among the rest. One of them is the video above, which shows 8 years of a young man's life in continuous stop-motion.

PSA Uses ‘Photo a Day’ Concept to Draw Attention to Domestic Violence

Photographer Noah Kalina's Everyday project features one photo of his face every day, and has been running since January 11, 2000. Kalina uploaded time-lapse videos created using the photos in 2006 and 2012, and both videos quickly went viral online. Not only did they amass millions of views, but they sparked a new phenomenon as well, as people around the world started snapping daily photos of their own faces and uploading similar videos to the web.

The video above is one that uses the same idea popularized by Kalina, except it's very different from the rest (warning: it's a bit disturbing).