medical

Nikon’s New Lens Tech is a Danger to Medical Devices

Nikon's new $14,000 400mm f/2.8 TC VR S lens for mirrorless cameras has been getting terrific reviews, but there is another more unusual reason the lens stands out in Nikon's lineup: Nikon warns that you should not use it if you have a pacemaker or any other kind of medical device.

Wet Plate Collodion Portraits of Burn Victims

Clément Marion, a French photographer in his early twenties, shoots only with analog processes. In his latest project, he decided to use wet plate collodion to capture intimate portraits of burn victims.

How to Hold Your Camera: Tips from a Chiropractor

As a chiropractor, I’m always looking for improved biomechanics that reduce injury and fatigue. Proper camera technique increases stability, improves capture quality and protects your joints from repetitive microtrauma.

Nikon Expanding Into Medical Devices with $400M Acquisition of Retinal Imaging Firm

Last year Nikon announced that it had set aside $1.96 billion for mergers and acquisitions into new industries in order to diversity from the camera industry that had grown the 98-year-old company to greatness.

The Japanese company is now using a portion of that cash pile on its first major expansion purchase: a £259M (~$400M) acquisition of the Scottish retinal imaging firm Optos.

Love Sick: An Incredibly Creative Medical-Themed Pre-Wedding Shoot

"Don't be afraid to be different." That is the moral of this video. Usually you save the moral for the end, but it is stated, restated and demonstrated so well with this shoot that it's worth starting the post with. Don't be afraid to let your creativity break the barriers of the proverbial box and try something different, because you might just stumble onto an idea as unique and creative as "Love Sick" by Simeon Quarrie of Vivida.

How Veterans Are Using Photography to Cope With PTSD

PTSD, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, is a serious problem that affect a huge percentage of war veterans. A condition once associated most strongly with Vietnam War veterans, the Afghanistan and Iraq war have brought the condition back into the public eye with a vengeance.

According to the National Institute of Health, the VA estimates that approximately 31% of Vietnam vets, 10% of Desert Storm vets, 11% of Afghanistan vets and 20% of Iraq war veterans are affected. And while photography has been used to great effect to document PTSD in the past, one nurse at the VA in Palo Alto, California is using it to help treat veterans with the condition.

Is the World Ready for Wearable Cameras (Or Cyborgs)?

Professor and self-proclaimed cyborg Steve Mann created an eye and memory-aid device he calls the EyeTap Digital Glass. The EyeTap, worn by Mann above on the left, is a wearable device that is similar to Google Eye, pictured right, but he's been making them at home since the 1980s. The goal of his project is to use images to aid memory, or even to augment the memories of people with Alzheimer's Disease or who simply want to preserve their memories more permanently. However, a recent misunderstanding over Mann's technology allegedly caused a confrontation between Mann and several employees at a Paris McDonald's restaurant.

Image Sensor Implants Used as Makeshift Eyes for the Blind

Image sensors and the advent of digital imaging have been met with differing reactions from the photographical community. But what a team of doctors at the Oxford Eye Hospital have managed to do with the technology is 100% digital, and 100% amazing. Clinical trial leaders Robert MacLaren and Tim Jackson have helped two blind men to partially see again.

Life as a Human Guinea Pig: Inside the Weird World of Medical Studies

Medical experiments can be quite bizarre -- I once heard about one that involved injecting subjects with various kinds of animal feces. After a year of participating in various clinical trials for cash, photographer and recent art-school graduate Josh Dickinson decided to start a project called Studied to document what it's like to be a human guinea pig. His experiences range from being pricked with needles and subjected to pain to being suffocated...