developer

How to Make Your Own Photo Paper Developer from Scratch

If you're a film photographer who likes to go the do-it-yourself rather than store-bought route, here's a fun little tutorial for you. In this 3-minute Darkroom Magic episode by the George Eastman Museum, Historic Process Specialist Nick Brandreth shows how you can make your own photo paper developer at home from scratch.

Make Your Own Film Developer and Fixer Using These Household Items

Last week, photographer Brendan Barry created a timely tutorial on how to turn your bedroom into a giant camera, and use it to take actual pictures. But what if you don't have any photographic chemicals around for developing and fixing those images? Barry's got you covered.

Developing Film With Beer and Other Nostalgia

I had been working at a liquor store to get away from myself and all the photography things I knew well. The extra money was nice, however, my photography burnout had my creativity hostage and didn’t seem to have an end anytime soon. So when Dogfish Head announced their Super 8 Beer and the claim that you could develop film in it, I had to try it. Not actually develop film in it -- hell no! I’ve been digital for twenty years and a film cameras’ place was on the shelf for decoration and memories.

The Developist is an In-Development DIY Auto Film Processor

A truly mass-market (and widely adopted) at-home automatic film processing machine has yet to appear in the world of photography. Photographer Mark Webb didn't want to wait around for one to show up, so he cobbled together one with his hardware and software knowledge. It's called the Developist.

How to Develop Film with Beer

Picture it: it's Saint Patrick's Day, you've run out of Black & White film developer, all the stores are closed down... the only thing you can find is beer. Nothing worse could happen, but don't worry! We have the solution to develop your roll of film.

How to Develop Color Negative Film at Home in 10 Minutes

Developing your own color negative film at home might not be as scary as you think. With a simple developing kit, a few accessories, and a short tutorial, the folks at the Film Photography Project will show you how to do it in just 10 minutes.

R3 Monobath Developer Lets You Process Your Film with One Chemical Bath

In March 2014, we reported that inventor Bob Crowley and his startup New55 were working on producing a new line of 4x5 instant film. That Kickstarter campaign turned out to be a smashing success. As the company continues to work on its instant film aspirations, its has released a new product that many photographers may find useful.

It's a new monobath developer called R3 that lets you develop, stop, and fix black-and-white photographic film with a single bath.

A Visualization of the Work that Went Into Making Magic Lantern What it is Today

In the past month and a half, Magic Lantern has seemingly made the impossible possible by bringing high definition RAW video to several Canon cameras and turning the cinema camera world upside down. With how fast these most recent updates have come out, it's easy to forget how much work has gone into Magic Lantern over the years.

A1ex from Magic Lantern's main development team wanted to remind us, and so he created this video representation of the work that the team has had put in to go from humble beginnings to the hack's current level of awesomeness.

Nikon SDK C# Wrapper Library Lets You Control Your DSLR from Your Computer

Nikon released software development kits (SDKs) for its SLRs some time ago, allowing for developers to create software that play nice with Nikon cameras. Using the company's DSLR SDKs, savvy programmers can develop software that controls camera functions such as aperture, shutter speed and even shutter release.

Unfortunately, Nikon's SDKs are notoriously difficult to work with. But if you're just dying to control your SLR from your computer, SourceForge user Thomas Dideriksen has kindly done the heavy lifting for you by putting together an open source C# wrapper library that allows you to do just that.

Surreal Portraits Created by Painting Developer Onto Photo Paper

At first glance, photographer Timothy Pakron's "Silver Print" series of portraits might look like ink paintings or some kind of CG art. They're actually photographs created by hand painting developer onto photo paper in the darkroom instead of immersing the paper entirely in the solution. Pakron writes,

By using the familiarity of the face as the template, my process involves hand painting the developer in the darkroom, intentionally revealing specific, desired aspects of the face in the negative. Doing so creates a stark negative space that gives the portrait a lucidity. Instead of creating a realistic, straight from film portrait, I am more interested in exploring how the original image can be brought to the surface in alternative ways. The portraits embody their own unique strangeness.

Camera+ Shuttered from App Store for Hidden Banned Feature

It looks like tap tap tap's Camera+ added one too many features for Apple's liking. When the app developers tweeted a secret workaround that enabled the volume button to double up to control the shutter, Apple pulled Camera+ from the App Store.
Just this week, developer John Casasanta wrote in a blog post that an upgraded version of the app originally intended to launch the feature, VolumeSnap. VolumeSnap would have also allowed users to use the volume control on iPhone headphones as a remote shutter control. Pretty nifty.

But Apple rejected tap tap tap's new version, citing this as a reason:
Your application cannot be added to the App Store because it uses iPhone volume buttons in a non-standard way, potentially resulting in user confusion. Changing the behavior of iPhone external hardware buttons is a violation of the iPhone Developer Program License Agreement. Applications must adhere to the iPhone Human Interface Guidelines as outlined in the iPhone Developer Program License Agreement section 3.3.7
So tap tap tap left out the feature -- at first. The app retained the feature, which was now hidden, but could be enabled by pointing the phone's browser to a specific site provided by the developers.