Inspiration

 

Marcus Haney: The Music Photographer Who Made it By Sneaking into the World’s Biggest Shows

If there is a path that music photographers usually take to make it big, it’s not the path Marcus Haney chose. Rather than start at the lowest levels by shooting smaller gigs to build a portfolio and reputation, Haney decided to start things off by sneaking into Coachella as a faux credentialed photographer back in 2010. He was only a junior studying at USC.

The trailer above is for an upcoming documentary titled No Cameras Allowed, which chronicles Haney’s unconventional journey into the world of concert photography.
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Video: Blind Photographer Shows Us What it Really Means to ‘See’

Australian-based photographer Brendon Borellini sees the world differently than most of us. In fact, he doesn’t really see it at all. This is because Borellini was born with congenital deafness and partial blindness, which has since turned into complete blindness.

You’re probably thinking to yourself that these disabilities aren’t exactly conducive to becoming a photographer, but Borellini has overcome them, making the most of every ounce of life doing what he loves. Read more…

external Gallery: Capturing Heat on Camera —WNYC

Photographer and Editor of The New York Times Lens blog, James Estrin, on how photographers capture heat on camera and the challenges of news photography in sweltering conditions.

 
Jul 23, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Student and Photo Enthusiast Takes His Own Grad Photo, Blows Away the Standard Grad Shot

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For going on four years now, casual photographer and shop teacher Aaron Cyr‘s mom has been bugging him for a graduation photo. By this year, he was already two degrees in and about to get his third, but he just couldn’t make himself pony up for the standard, banal grad photos he saw his peers getting.

Still, you can only tell your supportive mom ‘no’ so many times, and so this year he delivered… on his own terms. Read more…

How 4 Photo Editors Are Using Instagram

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Instagram is a powerful tool that professional photographers must take seriously if they want to be discovered via the platform – because just like every other person with a smart phone, photo editors from major publications are on there too. It’s a way to stay top of mind and connected with the photo-editors you’ve previously worked with, and to share work that can catch their eye and could inspire your next assignment.

We asked 4 photo editors 4 questions regarding the app and how they use it professionally to discover new talent, what they like to see from the photographers they’ve worked with, and what not to post. Read on for tips. Read more…

Forget Clouds: Man Photographs Cheetos That Look Like Things

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Have you ever looked up and noticed that a particular cloud looks like a face, a dog, a ship, or some other object? It’s a psychological phenomenon known as pareidolia, where the human brain takes randomness and tries to turn it into something significant and known.

Andy Huot’s project Cheese Curl Art revolves around pareidolia, but instead of spotting things in clouds, Huot photographs Cheetos. Recognize the Cheeto above? The photographer captioned it, “Sasquatch.”
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Photographing the Nazca Geoglyphs in Peru: An Interview with Photographer Ed Ranney

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Aroma Valley, Chile, 2006. © Ed Ranney

Edward Ranney has been photographing pre-Columbian sites in Peru for over fifty years. His book Monuments of the Incas was released in 1982, reprinted in paperback in 1990, and re-released in 2010 by Thames and Hudson in an expanded edition, with updated text.

His monograph The Lines, being released in August by Yale University Press, presents pictures of geoglyphs created by the Nazca culture in southern Peru, and other cultures in Chile’s Atacama desert. Read more…

Video: Photographing the ‘Most Beautiful Subway System in the World’

St. Petersburg-born photographer Alexander Dragunov has found his niche in the photography world, photographing the surreal, beautiful — and often empty — subway stations of Sweden’s capital in a project titled Stockholm Metro.

Oftentimes looking like something straight out of a sci-fi film, these caves-turned transportation hubs create mind-bending compositions when lack of commuters and symmetry gets involved.
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external Overcoming A Brain Injury Through Photography —NY Times

Though he sees double and his vision is erratic — fluctuating hourly — he still takes pictures. But now he uses a plastic Holga camera to make images that convey how he experiences the world. His hands shake when he holds the camera, but he makes that work for him, though his photos are now blurry.

 
Jul 20, 2014 · ∞ Permalink · No Comments »

Kirsty Mitchell Bids a Fond Farewell to Wonderland with Her Most Spectacular Photograph Yet

Five years and 74 truly stunning (not the click-bait type) photographs later, photographer Kirsty Mitchell and the heroine of her story, Katie, are both bidding a fond farewell to Wonderland and everything it has meant to them over the past half-decade.

And while this isn’t the final photograph in the series (two smaller pieces will close out the 5-year labor of love and unmatched artistry) Mitchell describes this photo, dubbed ‘The Fade of Fallen Memories…’, as “the mountaintop I have spent 5 years clawing my way towards.” Read more…