Posts Tagged ‘us’

Inspiration: Take a Stunning 4K Time-Lapse Trip Across the US in Five Minutes

Last month we featured A Day In the Life of Roadtrippers time-lapse photographer Joel Schat — a wonderful, jealousy-inducing BTS look at Schat’s travels. And today we have for you the product of those many days spent traveling across the country, cameras in tow. No surprise: it’s a beauty. Read more…

Leica’s ‘Let Us Roam’ Film Series Looks at the Lives of Skateboarder/Photographers

An incredible short film series is coming to life thanks to the production prowess of Helio Collective and iconic camera brand Leica. Called “Let Us Roam,” the series tells the stories of photographers, artist, filmmakers and musicians, all within the subculture of skateboarding. Read more…

Creative Project Combines Time-Lapse and Stop-Motion to Capture a US Road Trip

PetaPixel readers should already be familiar with Eric Paré‘s work. Often a combination of multiple photographic disciplines, his videos offer, if not something unique, then something at the very least different from the multitude of time-lapse, stop-motion and light painting work out there.

His newest project, called WindScale, is a combination of time-lapse and stop-motion that he and a friend created on their way from Montréal to Burning Man in Nevada last year. Read more…

Stunning 4K Time-Lapse Captures Scenes from All Over the US

The term “alchemy” typically evokes images of the transformation of base metals to gold, but for their short film by the same name, Eviosa Studios was trying to capture the kinds of transformations that are happening around us each and every day. And what better way to capture transformation than by shooting a time lapse. Read more…

Rent Out and Borrow Studio Resources with StudioShare

Here’s a pretty cool idea: StudioShare.org is a website through which individuals can rent studio gear or space from each other. Members can either simply sign up to rent, or if they’re a studio owner, they can sign up to both rent and to rent out their studio space. All members can rent out their gear if they wish, though it’s probably a good idea to get equipment insurance first.

Photographers can also set up collaborations with each other using the site, as well as offer their creative services for studio shoots — and services aren’t limited to photographers, it could include stylists, makeup artists, and other creative talents.

The site streamlines all the prep for a photo shoot, from the creative services to the gear, lighting, and space. The site also emphasizes the human element of photo shoots, allowing users to network with each other and to share portfolios and resumes.

Membership starts at $49 and StudioShare takes a 20% commission on rates set by resource owners.

One drawback to the service is that it is relatively small right now, with less than 2,000 members in the United States with a rather thin distribution. Since the available stock and resources depend on that number and location of members, it might be a bit early to jump in as a renting member until the pool of studio and equipment owners grows.

StudioShare.org (via Small Aperture)

Photoshopped Campaign Banner Sparks Controversy

A banner on Andrew Romanoff’s Senate campaign website provoked a bit of an outrage from a minority group when people realized that it was digitally manipulated.

The original photo shows Romanoff, the Democratic candidate from Colorado, at a campaign kickoff.

The photo for the banner was tinted blue, and then had several people from other images spliced into it, presumably in order to make Romanoff look like he was surrounded by more followers. Some of the added people include an African American woman to the right of Romanoff, as well as a Latino American man towards the center of the banner. The photo changes caused some minorities to believe Romanoff was trying to appear like his supporters were more diverse.

The Photoshopped African American woman, Andrea Mosby, told reporters that she has no problem with the photo-tweak, since she supports Romanoff and was at the same rally.

Others disagree on principle. According to the Denver Post, Colorado minority leaders wrote to Romanoff’s campaign, expressing that they were “shocked, disturbed and outraged” that the campaign felt the need to manipulate an image to appear like he had more minority supporters. Some 25 people signed the letter that called the candidate’s integrity into question, saying:

“We are NOT random people to be moved around for aesthetic reasons…We are NOT political pawns to be used when convenient nor do we accept being manipulated and repositioned when it serves one’s political motives…The Photoshopping in of minorities is not acceptable and falls far short of the integrity we expect of candidates running for the US Senate.”

Romanoff’s campaign said that the banner was intended as a photo collage or montage of the event, designed by a volunteer to reflect the overall attendance at the campaign event.

Romanoff later removed the image from the site and issued an apology:

This decision and a description of it have caused offense. I regret that and have removed the montage from our website. I take offense at any suggestion that our campaign attempted to deceive anyone. That’s outrageous and false. I bring a lifetime of commitment to equality and opportunity, and I reject these attacks on my character. I am very proud of the diverse support we’ve already received and continue to earn every day.

(via Denver Post)

Grim Military Footage Reveals Death of Two Reuters Employees

A video released on WikiLeaks.org shows disturbing footage taken in 2007 from an American apache helicopter as they circle and fire upon a group of people they identify as armed hostiles in the street.

As it turns out, the two men who appear to be armed are actually working Reuters employees: photographer, 22-year-old Namir Noor-Eldeen, and his driver, Saeed Chmagh, who was 40. The two men were walking in the street with camera straps hanging from their shoulders. One of the men has a long lens, misidentified as an RPG.

According to a New York Times article published yesterday, Reuters had heard of a military raid in the area — the same raid that the military was attending to, and the two men went to investigate. Their mere proximity to the raid proved to be fatal.

The military fired upon the men and other individuals, who were later confirmed to be civilians, among them two children and the two Reuters employees. The attack killed 12, including Noor-Eldeen and Chmagh.

In a United States Central Command report:

“[The men] made no effort to visibly display their status as press or media representatives and their familiar behavior with, and close proximity to, the armed insurgents and their furtive attempts to photograph the coalition ground forces made them appear as hostile combatants to the Apaches that engaged them.”

Reuters news editor in chief David Schlesinger said in a statement:

“The deaths of Namir Noor-Eldeen and Saeed Chmagh three years ago were tragic and emblematic of the extreme dangers that exist in covering war zones. We continue to work for journalist safety and call on all involved parties to recognize the important work that journalists do and the extreme danger that photographers and video journalists face in particular.”

(via New York Times)

Top US Patents Captured by Non-American Companies

Just as the Winter Olympics are heating up international competition in Vancouver this week, the U.S. has suffered a bit of a statistical loss to non-American companies on home turf: American-owned companies have captured far fewer U.S. patents from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in 2009. U.S. corporations hold about 49% of all U.S. utility patents in 2009, while non-U.S. firms hold the majority.

In a repeat of last year’s trend, major Asian companies, such as South Korea’s Samsung, Japan’s Canon, Panasonic, Toshiba, Sony and Seiko Epson have snagged a spot in the top ten in number of patents issued in 2009, according to the IFI Claims Patent Services ranking.

An interesting note: out of the top 10 on the list, many, such as Canon (viewfinder patent sketch featured above), Panasonic, are diverse companies whose products include printers and televisions, but have a notable stake in the consumer camera industry. Fujifilm, a Japanese-owned company dedicated to consumer camera products alone, placed 19th on the top 50 list as well.

Though the sheer number of patents does imply an accelerated growth and company innovation with an intent to bring the products to a consumer market, the press release notes that America has held its own considering the recession climate that still lingers:

Although the margin of patent dominance between U.S. and non-U.S. firms is slight and has been for several years, there is no uncertainty that foreign firms are adding patents at a frenetic pace.  “Interest in protecting corporate intellectual property has become intense both in the U.S. and abroad, and as a result we’re seeing an increased level of patent activity,” continued [general manager of IFI Patent Intelligence Darlene] Slaughter.  “The silver lining may be that the high priority foreign firms place on U.S. patents is a confirmation of the value and importance that the U.S. market represents.”

U.S. companies, IBM, Microsoft, Intel, and Hewlett-Packard held top spots on the rank as well, at 1st, 3rd, 8th, and 10th, respectively.