Posts Tagged ‘rules’

FAA Unveils Its Rules for Commercial Drone Usage

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The FAA has confirmed a leak that emerged this past weekend by officially unveiling its proposed set of rules governing commercial drone flights. The guidelines are more lax than many people feared, and they represent a huge step toward the legalization of commercial drone flights — including for aerial photography purposes.
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Major Museums Are Now Banning Selfie Sticks

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As the selfie stick craze sweeps the nation, major museums in the United States are banning the device in order to protect both visitors and artworks.
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Bridging the Gap: What Classical Art Can Teach You About Creating Timeless Photographs

In a similar vein as the comprehensive composition video we shared with you yesterday, this 2012 lecture by photographer Adam Marelli uses classical art to show how we as photographers face the exact same challenges in lighting and composition today as they did centuries ago.

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Video: A CGI Artist’s Comprehensive Guide to Understanding Composition

The basic rules of composition apply to almost every visual art there is, be it photography, painting or graphic design. Whether it’s the rule of thirds or the rule of triangles, the principles overlap, leaving the educational resources for each respective art form useful across the board, not tied down to one specific field.

This is why we decided to share the above video, which is one of the most comprehensive looks at understanding composition that we’ve ever come across. Created by CGI artist Andrew Price, its usefulness extends far beyond the realm of computer-based graphics.

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Warning: Fly Your Camera Drone Near a Big Sports Stadium, Go to Jail

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Earlier this year, we shared an interactive map showing where you aren’t allowed to fly camera drones. The list is generally pretty simple: national parks, military bases, and 5 miles around major airports.

Here’s another item to add to that list: major sport stadiums.
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Cameras Don’t Break Rules, People Break Rules

Moose

A portrait session that results in the death of the subject should be called a failure.

As reported by the Salt Lake Tribune, a group of photographers and onlookers experienced precisely that level of catastrophic botchery last week in Grand Teton National Park when crowding too close to a moose (not a good idea).

The moose, already agitated by the presence of a nearby bull moose, was scared by the approaching park-visitors and bolted before stumbling over a picnic table and landing on a fire grate. With its hoof caught in the grate, the half-ton animal collapsed and broke its leg so badly that park rangers were forced to put it down. Read more…

US Forest Service Proposes Controversial and Expensive Photo Permit Rules

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The US Forest Service is under fire today after proposing a set of rules that would put strict restrictions on photographers and filmmakers who want to ply their trade in wilderness areas. The rules subject potential projects to an approval process with permits costing as much as $1,500 while fines for breaking the rules would run around $1,000. Read more…

A Concise Video Refresher of the Basic Rules of Composition

Composition and the rules that accompany it are some of the most basic aspects you learn when first picking up a camera. If you’ve been a photographer long, it’s probably safe to say that the “rule of thirds” and “golden mean” are ingrained into your brain so well that it’s second-nature now.

That being said, every once in a while it’s nice to take a fresh look at the rules and the underlying concepts behind them — if for no other reason than because you have to know the rules in order to break them properly. Read more…

Award-Winning Washington Post Photo DQed for Excessive Photoshopping

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There have been several controversies surrounding award-winning photography of late. First there was photographer Harry Fisch, who had his Nat Geo Photo Contest award stripped for cloning out a bag. Then Magnum photographer Paolo Pellegrin’s ethics were called into question when he was accused of misrepresenting the subject of his award-winning photo.

And now another controversy has come to our attention, this one revolving around the photo above, taken by Washington Post staff photographer Tracy Woodward. The above photo was the version that was submitted to and won the White House News Photographers Association’s (WHNPA) ‘Eyes of History’ stills photo contest, but not before it was significantly manipulated in Photoshop. Read more…

Why Photogs in Certain States Can’t Enter Nat Geo’s Photo Contest

Yesterday we reported that Nikon Photo Contest is no longer accepting film photos starting this year. Turns out it’s not the only prestigious photo contest with rules that are causing some discussion. Check out what National Geographic Photo Contest 2012 says under the rules section “Who May Enter”:

Contest is open only to individuals who have reached the age of majority in their jurisdiction of residence at the time of entry and who do NOT reside in Cuba, Iran, New Jersey, North Korea, the Province of Quebec, Sudan, Syria or Vermont. Employees of National Geographic Society, and its subsidiaries and affiliates […] CONTEST IS VOID IN CUBA, IRAN, NEW JERSEY, NORTH KOREA, THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC, SUDAN, SYRIA, VERMONT AND WHERE PROHIBITED.

Iran and North Korea? Those are understandable… but New Jersey and Vermont? Turns out there’s a pretty simple answer for those states as well: state laws.
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