Posts Tagged ‘drop’

Guy Drops a $2,300 Lens Or: How NOT to Screw a Lens On & Off ‘Just Like the Pros’

Usually we try to stay away from traumatizing you at the very beginning of the week, but this week, we’ll make an exception. The video above started out as a tutorial on how to quickly attach and detach a lens “just like a pro”; it turned into a cringeworthy photographer fail. Read more…

Slow-Speed Photography: Pitch Tar Drop Caught on Camera After 69-Year Wait

There doesn’t seem to be any shortage of high-speed cameras out there, doing work to slow down footage of fast moving objects enough for us to study what’s happening in that short, short time frame. But what about using a camera to capture what could potentially be the slowest moving substance of all time? Yep — someone’s doing it.
Read more…

Canon’s T5i Takes On Nikon’s D5200 in a Cringe-Worthy Drop Test

It’s one of a photographer’s worst fears: dropping your DSLR. Especially for the amateur who may not have a backup, knowing that your camera can withstand a beating has led to some interesting videos in the past.

But while we appreciate DigitalRev’s “paint it pink and light it on fire” approach, protection plan company SquareTrade‘s more scientific test is probably more useful (if less entertaining). In the video above, SquareTrade enlists the help of pro photographer and B&H employee Neil Gershman to drop test Canon’s T5i and Nikon’s D5200. Read more…

Use a Drop of Water as a Macro Lens for Phone Photographs

Here’s a super cool trick: instead of buying a special macro lens for your smart phone, simply use a drop of water! Carefully place a drop of water over your lens, carefully invert the phone, and voila — instant macro shots with the cheapest lens you’ll ever own. Alex Wild over at Scientific American has more details on the technique and some great sample shots taken with it.

Transform Your iPhone Into a Microscope: Just Add Water (via Gizmodo)

Worlds Captured in Drops of Water

We’ve featured photographs of paintings and candies captured in drops of water before, but photographer Markus Reugels‘ water drops double as planets. By photographing drops of water in front of images of Earth and the moon, he’s able to transform the liquid spheres into beautiful worlds.
Read more…

Candies Photographed in Water Drops

Photographer Patrick Lindsay shot this beautiful photograph of gumballs seen through water drops. It’s similar to the MC Escher water drop photo we shared a while ago, but is much easier to create since the drops of water aren’t moving in this photo.
Read more…