PetaPixel

Nokia Caught Faking PureView Floating Lens Stabilization in Promo Video

This promo video for Nokia’s new “floating lens” image stabilization technology is causing a lot of discussion… and not for reasons Nokia should be proud about. After we included the video in a post today about the Lumia 920’s PureView camera, commenters pointed us to a post over on The Verge revealing that the video was faked.

During one portion of the video, as the happy-go-lucky girl is apparently being filmed through the floating lens on the Lumia 920, she rides past a trailer with a window:

Take a closer look at the reflection, and you’ll see that it’s actually a man, a van, and some kind of steadicam that’s capturing the footage:

Here’s a video created by The Verge showing the segment in question:

Afte word of this fakery got out, Nokia responded to The Verge confirming that the ad is misleading. They write,

We spoke with a Nokia spokesperson who agrees that the PureView ad is misleading. They stressed that it was “never the company’s intention to deceive anyone,” but only to demonstrate the benefits of optical image stabilization.

Nokia has updated its original blog post with the blurb “[...] the OIS video, above, was not shot using the Lumia 920,” and may update the video itself with a similar disclosure.

Either way, it’s pretty clear that the video was intended to deceive, as it’s made to look like the video was captured by the guy biking alongside the girl. The PureView floating lens technology could very well meet — or exceed — the amazing stabilization ability seen in the video, but sadly, Nokia has already done a huge amount of damage to its reputation by not disclosing this fact from the beginning.


 
  • jdm8

    This is disappointing. If I’m considering a product’s features, I’d want the actual product to be used to demonstrate said feature. I doubt the Lumia can do the job anywhere nearly that well on OIS. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s on some kind of external mechanical stabilization device as well as a large sensor camera.

    Even if, strictly speaking, they weren’t lying, it’s highly misleading.

  • jdm8

    This is disappointing. If I’m considering a product’s features, I’d want the actual product to be used to demonstrate said feature. I doubt the Lumia can do the job anywhere nearly that well on OIS. I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s on some kind of external mechanical stabilization device as well as a large sensor camera.

    Even if, strictly speaking, they weren’t lying, it’s highly misleading.

  • jdm8

    That’s very disappointing, and clearly misleading. I’d want to know the
    given product’s ability to do said job, not the ideal form with a large
    sensor camera and likely external stabilizer.

  • rtfe

    companies lying/misleading information to the public? say it aint so

  • Violeta Ivanova

    Is it just me or the “nightlife street photos” in the end look like there’s been some pasting and retouching from studio shots?

  • 11

    that video looks like it is stabilized in post (eg warp stabilizer in AE). In order to correct such large vibrations optically, lens would have to jiggle outside the barrel of the lens.
    00:40 for example.

  • http://italobrito.tumblr.com/ Ítalo Brito

    Also, the still shots sure look like they have been made with a DSLR and external flash. In order for the model to be in focus and the cars in the background appear with motion blur, I’m pretty sure they used a flash to freeze the model and a slow shutter speed to blur the cards. Off-camera lighting 101.

    I can’t imagine how one could do that with simple software or image stabilization, no matter how good it is.

  • NDT

    Its fair enough that they made this advertisement using a more capable camera, like a DSLR, but the fact they have inserted shots that are clearly meant to be “POV of the camera” shots is just misleading. I believe adobe were scolded for faking the blur correction technology in the new Photoshop at one of the conventions.

  • Thewirehead

    *Video shot on magical iPhone 5.

  • Max

    Nokia = Blood minerals.. deceptive marketing.. criminals…

  • Robin

    Well, maybe I could believe that a new generation of optical stabilization could achieve the effect seen in the videos although they were done with a different system than a viewer would presume. However, what really SHOCKED me and made me wonder how stupid really Nokia thinks people are, were the night stills, where OBVIOUSLY at least two additional off-camera strobes are used to freeze the movement. Even supposing a camera phone was capable of such picture quality, the lighting set-up is out of question. Imagine Canon released an EOS 1200D and used Hasselblad pictures to promote it.

  • CX1

    It was more funny when Nikon used a Canon video for an ad.

  • http://twitter.com/adamhruby Adam Hrubý

    OMG! Advertising is FAKE and decieving! That’s outrageous! How could they? #youdontsay #gullible

  • Globe

    Nokia, how much did you pay for this advert? Call me and I will do one for you for half the price and more professionally.. What a joke..

  • Paul Lind

    I have this phone and it work very well, just remember it’s just a commercial , this phone take’s some sick pic’s took this pic the other day ,this lil guy was tiny too I had taking many shot’s and video with camera and just get blown away every time, shot some high quality vids at Disney and was shocked when I uploaded them to my pc looked like professional film crew shot it I would upload it but vids are like 10 minutes long HD

  • Paul Lind

    oh and the spider was moving with wind slightly moving the web ” pureview works “

  • Paul Lind

    Apple has tried to tackle this problem in recent years with its Siri personal assistant for iOS, whose web search results will be powered by Microsoft’s Bing search engine in iOS 7, the upcoming revamp of Apple’s mobile operating system.