preset

Photographer using Adobe Lightroom on an iPad Pro.

The Best Free Adobe Lightroom Presets and Where to Get Them

From importing, to organizing, to the editing process itself, few tools have the capacity to define a photographer’s workflow like Adobe’s Lightroom. Of the program’s many indispensable features, the ability to create user presets ranks quite high: it offers photographers the ability to lock in preferred looks, adjustments, and settings for rapid implementation across multiple images. Better still, these presets are readily shareable, allowing users easy access to the settings required for virtually any desired result without going through the hassle of creating them themselves.

Creating the Best Possible Kodak Tri-X Black and White Film Simulation

Shooting black and white film over digital in the last few years has changed my approach to photography a great deal. The process of shooting film, from the tactility of the Leica M7 and Rolleiflex 2.8D cameras that I use, to developing and scanning, have given me a much deeper appreciation for the craft of being a photographer.

How to Create a Cinematic Lightroom Preset for Landscape Photos

Lately, I’ve seen lots of cinematic looks on Instagram. There are mostly cold tones with a rare spark of a warm look. And so I have decided to have a look, do some magic, and produce a free Lightroom landscape preset for you. I know, there are lots of Lightroom presets for travel photography, but in reality, I couldn’t find anything usable that also came with an explanation. So, read on to learn how to create cinematic photography yourself.

This Preset Pack Brings Real Dehaze to Lightroom 6.1

When Adobe launched a major Creative Cloud update that brought the powerful new Dehaze slider to Lightroom CC, photographers who had purchased a standalone copy of Lightroom 6 instead of subscribing to Adobe CC didn't receive the new features.

If that describes you, there's some great news for you today: your Lightroom 6.1 can have Dehaze as well thanks to a new free preset pack by Prolost.

VSCO Cam Adds the Alchemy Collection: 10 Presets for Cross Processed Looks

The war of photo filters rages on. Instagram recently added more filters and more editing tools to its popular smartphone app, and now VSCO is striking back with a new set of presets of its own. The company has just released The Alchemy Collection, a pack of 10 presets for giving your photos the look of cross processed film.

Litely Brings Subtle, Film-Inspired Presets to Your Mobile Photography

As Instagram goes to show, people love to give their mobile photos that extra bit of pop, to make them stand out from the rest and give them an aesthetic true to photography past. To do so, they rely on various applications, most notably VSCO Cam, which claims to be the “standard” among mobile photography applications. However, as of today, there’s a new contender: Litely.

VSCO Film 03 is Like a Desktop Instagram for Pro Photographers

Film emulation software company VSCO has added another offering to its lineup of Lightroom and Adobe Camera Raw plugins. VSCO Film offers the same high-end film emulation power as Film 01 and 02, except it's designed for mimicking the look of instant films rather than standard color and black-and-white film stocks.

Instagram Version One Filters Recreated as Lightroom Presets

We've featured Instagram-inspired presets for Lightroom in the past, and today a new challenger has emerged. The folks over at Really Nice Images has released a couple of preset packs that are designed to faithfully imitate the look of Instagram's popular filters. What's unique about this new offering is that the presets aren't limited to the latest version of the mobile app's filters -- there's also a pack containing the classic filters that were replaced after Instagram Version 2 came out.

Use “Focus Peaking” in Photoshop to Select In-Focus Areas of a Photo

Last week, we wrote about an emerging digital camera feature called "focus peaking", which lets users easily focus lenses through live view by using colorful pixels to highlight in-focus areas. Photographer Karel Donk wanted the same feature in Photoshop, which doesn't currently offer it, so he decided to create it himself.