modifier

A Low-Cost Lighting Technique for More Controllable and Dynamic Shots

Sometimes all it takes to bring a shoot to the "next level" is a little DIY work and a couple of cheap accessories. In a recently published video, videographer Alex Perri goes over how he used an affordable light shaping modifier along with duct tape and cardboard to create some iconic film-noir looks for a short film he produced for fun at home.

Using a Single DIY Globe Modifier for Simple, Stunning Portraits

It’s not often I get to shoot very simple, clean white light shots, but in a recent shoot the model asked if she could get some updated ‘Polaroids’. For those of you not familiar with the term when used in reference to a model shoot, it’s actually not the now-obsolete and ludicrously expensive single-shot film, but a request for very basic portraits of the model for their agency.

I Built a 22″ Gridded Beauty Dish for $4 Using Dollar Store Foam Boards

I recently got bored and decided to expand a super-budget project I'm working on. I love gridded beauty dishes for dramatic artsy stuff, beauty, and as a generally very versatile modifier. However, even a cheap one is out of budget for this project. So... I made one.

Quick Tip: How to Get Four Different Looks with One Photo Umbrella

Daniel Norton, the same photographer who showed you how to capture three distinct looks simultaneously when you're pressed for time on a shoot, is back for another useful quick tip. This time, he's showing you how to capture four distinct portrait looks with a single umbrella.

How to Make a Light Modifier for $5 with Card Stock, Glue, and Glitter

Here's a neat little weekend project you can try doing if you're looking for new lighting ideas. The Angry Photographer on YouTube posted this 10-minute video tutorial on how you can create a custom light reflector for around $5. All you need is black card stock, some colored glitter, and some strong glue.

Product Photography with the Light Blaster, a $3,450 Cheaper Alternative to Broncolor’s Optical Spot

We introduced you to the Light Blaster when it first came out in July of last year. A neat light modifier, it allowed you to use a lens and flash to project all sorts of patterns, slides and other non-digital backgrounds (or foregrounds) into your images.

The creative possibilities are pretty vast, but if you want to see what happens when a professional studio photographer gets his hands on it and starts experimenting, Alex Koloskov of Photigy is more than happy to oblige.

MagMod: A Solid and Simple Flash Modifier System That Uses Magnets, Not Velcro

A professional photographer since 2005, Spencer Boerup quickly learned that modularity and ease of use aren't very easily found in the world of flash modifiers. Sick of using "bulky, awkward, and cheap" modifiers that use velcro, straps, brackets and bands, Boerup decided to develop a new system that uses the power of magnetism. It's called MagMod, and has already generated quite a bit of buzz in the industry.

SpinLight 360: The Jack of All Trades of Flash Modifiers

Spinlight 360 is a relatively young startup company that makes modular flash modifier systems for speed lights. Its products are based around a ring assembly attached on the head of flash units that various modifiers can be mounted to, allowing it to be a "jack of all trades" of sorts when it comes to controlling light and shadows.

Use a Pringles Can as a Cheap Diffuser for Macro Photos

Flickr user Steve Kushnir came up with this neat idea of building a cheap DIY diffuser using a Pringles can, two layers of paper towels, and some rubber bands. He attached it to his Nikon D5000's popup flash and uses it for macro photographs of creepy crawlies.