meteorshower

Photographer Captures Six Meteor Showers in One Photo

In December of 2020, scientist and photographer Nathan Myhrvold captured over 100 meteors from the Geminids along with five other showers with a custom-designed, four-camera panoramic system. Afterward, they were animated together to show how they fill the night sky.

Meteor Shower

How to Photograph the Geminid Meteor Shower

The Geminid meteor shower is set to be a one of the most consistent meteor displays of the year, so we will be taking you through the preparation, shooting, and editing tips you'll need to capture the Geminid meteor shower from start to finish.

How to Take Gorgeous Smartphone Photos of the Lyrid Meteor Shower

The Lyrid meteor shower happens every year from April 16 through April 26, with the peak occurring typically around April 22. Taking great photos of the event does not require a high-end camera though, and you can get some great results with your smartphone by following these simple tips.

A Star Trail Timelapse of the Perseid Meteor Shower

A photographer named David from Hood River, Oregon, went out this weekend and photographed the night sky during the Perseid meteor shower. He then turned 400 of the photos into this star trail timelapse that contains several of the shooting stars he saw.

The Story of How My ISS Photo Went TOTALLY Viral

Here's my story on what it's like to have a photo go totally viral around the world. After accidentally capturing a portrait with the ISS in the background, I sent it to a lot of local news outlets in the Netherlands, along with a lot of big international photo blogs (PetaPixel was one of them).

I started by just contacting them on Facebook with a short message along with the photo, to just try to see if they would be interested in the photo itself. No need to write a long story if they don’t like the photo anyway, I thought.

How to Take a Self-Portrait with a Shooting Star

With a little bit of patience and a whole lot of luck, I was able to capture this photograph of myself perched on a rock above the Pacific Ocean. When I set out to photograph the annual famed Perseids Meteor Shower last week, I had a specific goal of capturing a "selfie" photograph with myself in frame and hopefully a meteor streaking overhead (along with a variety of other images throughout the evening). My hope turned into reality in the wee hours of Wednesday morning.

Photographer Snaps Meteor Leaving a ‘Z’ in the Sky

A couple of nights ago, Hawick, UK-based photographer Sam Cornwell spent some time in the great outdoors taking pictures of the April Lyrids meteor shower that happens from April 16 to April 26 of each year. Just as he was about to call it quits and return home without a keeper, Cornwell captured the above photo of a huge "fireball" streaking across the night sky.

This is What a Meteor Shower Looks Like from Space

The 2014 Perseid meteor shower will peak this week, and astrophotographers the world over will be gazing up at the skies, cameras contending with a very bright moon in the hopes of capturing some bright streaks across the sky.

And while some of them will undoubtedly succeed in capturing some stunning shots, there's one view not a single one will be able to get... the view of a meteor shower from above.

Photographer Captures Amazing Meteor Explosion Mid Time-Lapse

It's a day of awesome astronomical phenomenon on PetaPixel. We started off the day by sharing a stunning time-lapse by photographer Maciej Winiarczyk in which he captured noctilucent clouds and the aurora borealis at the same time.

And now, as you get ready to hit the home stretch and finish Monday on a good note, we have yet another amazing (and accidental) time-lapse capture: While photographing the 2013 Perseids Meteor Shower last week, photographer and designer Michael K. Chung was fortunate enough to capture an actual meteor explosion.

Time Lapse in Joshua Tree National Park During the Perseid Meteor Shower

Last week we featured a stunning time-lapse video that unfortunately failed to capture Perseid meteor shower well because of too much air traffic in the area. Landscape photographer Henry Jun Wah Lee attempted the same kind of video in Joshua Tree National Park. Even though there's still quite a bit of air traffic, you can clearly see quite a few shooting stars that light up the sky.

Perseid Meteor Shower Fail, Breathtaking Time-Lapse Win

Vimeo user ph dee went out to Anza-Borrego Desert State Park last night after hearing that it's a great place to watch meteor showers. After spending four hours shooting frames for a Perseid meteor shower timelapse video, he discovered that the heavy air traffic in the area dominated the scene.