marsrover

A Closer Look at the Mars Perseverance Rover’s Incredible Cameras

The Mars Perseverance Rover, which already has sent back some incredible images from the Red Planet, is equipped with 23 cameras designed for a host of tasks. Its main camera array is particularly impressive, able to see details as small as a tip of a pencil close by, and the size of an almond from a football field away in 3D.

‘Jelly Donut’ Rock Mysteriously Appears in Mars Rover Photo of Same Spot Days Apart

The Mars Opportunity Rover has found a jelly donut on Mars... man would that be an awesome headline. Unfortunately we couldn't run that unless we were intent on click baiting you (we're not...). What the 10-year-veteran Mars Rover did find (and photograph) is a mysterious rock that looks like -- and has been nicknamed -- the 'jelly donut.'

Why mysterious? Because it seemed to appear out of nowhere in pictures of the exact same spot on the Martian ground only 12 Martian days (or Sols) apart.

Mars Rover Opportunity Commemorates 10 Years on Mars by Sending Home a Selfie

When the Mars Rover Opportunity landed on our planetary neighbor on January 25th, 2004 it was undertaking a three-month mission. Well, it's a full decade later and the little guy is still alive and kickin' (in a robotic kind of way).

And what better way to celebrate that achievement then by taking a good ol' fashioned, 2014-like selfie?

Nine Month Time-Lapse of Photos Taken on Mars by the Curiosity Rover

NASA's Mars Curiosity Rover has sent down a constant stream of images from the Red Planet. Ever since it landed on August 8th, 2012, it's spent every spare moment snapping selfies, panoramas and surveillance footage, and sending it back home from between 33.9 and 250 million miles away (depending on the relative positions of Mars and Earth).

The majority of Curiosity's photos that get picked up by the press are taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager and Mastcam, but Curiosity is actually taking pictures each and every day. Equipped with Front Avoidance Hazard Cameras or "Hazcams," the rover has been snapping black-and-white images ever since it landed, and one YouTuber has decided to stitch all of those images into a time-lapse.

Space Enthusiasts Find Missing ’71 Soviet Lander Using Mars Orbiter Images

It turns out that the sharing of images taken by orbiters and rovers in space may have more of a purpose than just being cool to look at. According to a NASA press release published last Thursday, a group of amateur Russian space enthusiasts may have found a missing soviet Mars lander using nothing more than images from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.