glacier

These Before and After Photos Show How Glaciers in the US Are Melting

Over the past several years, the U.S. Geological Survey has been shooting a "Repeat Photography" project in various locations to show how glacier ice has been retreating over the past century. Using photos from the late 1800s and early 1900s as references, photographers are rephotographing those same scenes to show how things have changed (and are changing).

Photographer Documents a Melting Glacier in Africa with Lines of Fire

For his project "When I Am Laid in Earth," photographer Simon Norfolk traveled to Mount Kenya to photograph the melting away of the Lewis Glacier, the largest glacier on Africa's second tallest mountain. To capture what once was compared to what exists today, Norfolk used gasoline to create lines of fire that mark where the glacier lines once stood.

The photograph above shows where the Lewis Glacier ended in 1934.

Requiem of Ice: A Thought-Provoking, Visually Compelling Ode to a Disappearing Ice Cave

In a decade's time, the Sandy Glacier Caves -- thought to be the largest glacier cave system in the continental United States -- might disappear entirely. It was this startling discovery that led filmmaker Ben Canales and his team at Uncage the Soul onto the steep slopes of Mount Hood to film a visually breathtaking short film called Requiem of Ice.

Gorgeous ‘Trash the Dress’ Wedding Photos Captured on a Stunning Glacier in Alaska

It takes work to stand out among today's wedding photographers. After all, you've got shots like these from Iceland to compete with, so how do you create photos that will widen eyes and loosen jaws?

Well, if you're photographer Josh Martinez from Chugach Peaks Photography, you helicopter the couple onto a glacier in Alaska and let nature do the talking while you take some pictures and ruin a wedding dress.

Unique Wedding Photographs Taken Inside an Ice Cave in Alaska

We promise we didn't plan it, but after sharing Josh Newton's amazing wildfire wedding photographs last month, we've managed to stumble across their antithesis today.

Last month it was wedding photos in front of a raging wildfire. This month we give you another beautifully-shot set of wedding pictures, this time taken inside a bonafide, had-to-kayak-to-get-there ice cave.

Photos and Video of ‘Ice Heaves’ Slowly Tearing Through Homes in Minnesota

Yesterday we shared some photos of the Sun Halo that kept New Yorkers pointing their cameras skyward most of the day. That phenomenon is both harmless and cool to look at. Unfortunately, the recent ice heaves -- glacier-like lake ice that is pushed inland by strong winds -- in Minnesota only fall into the second of those categories..

Using Time-Lapse Photography to See the Movement of Massive Glaciers

People sometimes use the expression "slow as a glacier" to describe something so stagnant that even the speeds of snails and molasses would feel inadequately fast in comparison. The fastest glaciers ever measured move at tens of meters per day, while the slowest ones may budge only have a meter over the course of a year. Most of the time, the movement is too slow for the human eye to see.

Luckily for us, there's something called time-lapse photography. Back in 2004, PBS aired a NOVA episode titled Descent into the Ice, which followed photographers and adventurers as they ventured deep into the heart of a glacier found on Mont Blanc. One of the things they did was set up cameras to capture the movement of glaciers over extremely long periods of time. The video above shows 5 months of movement seen under a glacier moving 2 feet per day.