computationalphotography

HONOR Magic 4 Smartphone ranked best in the world by DXOMark

HONOR Sets A New Bar For Mobile Imaging With the Magic4 Series

HONOR recently announced the successor to the Magic3 smartphone, the Magic4, which has achieved record-breaking photo and video capabilities according to DXOMark. Despite a quick turnaround between models, the Magic4 Ultimate smartphone is (on paper) jam-packed with flagship specifications and a camera system that has been rated the best of its class by DXOMark with a score of 146, and the Magic4 Pro version achieving the Gold Label ranking, showing the company has built a system specifically for photography professionals and enthusiasts alike.

Photography is Dead! Long Live the Photographer!

The gentleman that I (and countless others) learned photography from is one O.P. Sharma, an internationally recognized, black-and-white film photographer. He is one of the masters of photography. He founded the India International Photography Council and was the driving force behind establishing 19 August as International Photography Day every year.

How Google’s Handheld Multi-Frame Super-Resolution Tech Works

Since there are physical limits to how large sensors can be in smartphones, companies like Google have been pushing heavily into computational photography, the use of digital rather than optical processes to improve the capabilities of a camera. Here's a 3-minute video that explains how Google's super-resolution technology works.

Photography: AI Everywhere

There are two major trends in photography today. The first is the ever-increasing numbers of photos being made. I can't even be bothered to look up how many billions of photos are being uploaded to Instickrbook every minute or every day or every year. It's a lot. This is usually talked about in terms of how many photos there are, and how we are drowning in them.

Why Dedicated Cameras Will Always Be (Optically) Better than Smartphones

It’s September, which means another generation of Apple iPhones. This year, the iPhone XS (pronounced “ten ess”) adds a slightly larger sensor plus significantly more computing power via the A12 Bionic Chip to enhance the phone’s image signal processing.