blended

Side-by-Side Photos That Blend Scenes from Around the World

After traveling through 40 countries in 2 years, Chanel Cartell and Stevo Dirnberger of How Far from Home decided to sift through their 14,000 photos and find similar shots from different parts of the world. Using these images, they created a series of beautiful "photo mashups," or side-by-side images that blend together in beautiful ways.

Portraits of a Man Blending Into World Landmarks

"Lost in Wonder" is a new project by New York-based artist Trina Merry, who's known for blending body art and photography to depict the human body in creative ways. Merry visited major "modern wonder" landmarks around the world and blended her model into each of the scenes.

These Portraits Were Created by Combining Photos of Celebrities

Pedro Berg Johnsen of Norway has an unusual hobby: in his spare time, he combines portraits of celebrities to create real-looking photos of people that don't actually exist. For example, the portrait above was created by blending the heads and faces of singer Taylor Swift and actress Emma Watson.

The Ultimate Coalition: Averaging the Portraits of UK Political Leaders

The image above may look strangely familiar to you. That’s because it’s a facial average of the leaders of the main political parties in this week’s general election in the UK. If you've been following UK politics, you have probably seen these people many times in the media, leading to an involuntary familiarity with them.

A facial average like the one above is created by digitally altering each person’s face to a matching position and expression, and then morphing them all together to create an average.

Playing Around with Average Faces Using Martin Schoeller’s Celebrity Portraits

Yesterday, PetaPixel shared photographer Richard Prince's composite portrat created by blending together 57 faces of girlfriends seen on Seinfeld. I also enjoy playing with the idea of image averaging, and can't get enough of it. Late last year, I started experimenting with the idea of averaging faces by blending portraits.

I needed a set of faces that were all semi-similar enough to create good averages with. Well, if you haven't seen the work of photographer Martin Schoeller, you are missing out! He has a series of close-ups that are shot with very similar lighting styles and compositions of famous (and not-so-famous) people. It's simply mesmerizing to see. I grabbed the shots above to try face averaging out with.

Photos of Modern Day Locations Blended with Shots of Major Historical Events

In 2010, photographer Seth Taras created a series of photographs for a worldwide marketing campaign for the History Channel with the message "Know Where You Stand." The photographer shot photos at locations around the world where major historical events happened, and then blended old photos showing those events from the same perspective. It's the same "then and now" concept that has become quite popular over the past few years.

Photos of People Wearing Clothing That Blends Into the Surroundings

For his project Transform, Hungarian photographer Bence Bakonyi scouted out colorful locations around his city and found clothing that matched each of the main colors in the scene. By dressing up models and having them stand in just the right location, Bakonyi was able to create photographs that look as though his subjects are blended into the background.

Creepy Portraits Show Subjects with One Head, Two Faces, and Three Eyes

You know those Photoshopped optical illusions that involve combining two photos of a person's face -- one straight on and one looking to the side -- into a single bizarre shot? Quebec, Canada-based photographer Ulric Collette put a spin on that concept with his new portrait series titled "Facade." Instead of using negative space and two completely different angles, Collette had his subjects turn their heads slightly to the side for the second shot, and then merged the two photos together by aligning one eye from each shot.

Ford Blends Cars Into Scenes Using Paint Instead of Photoshop

Chinese photographer Liu Bolin (AKA "The Invisible Man") has received quite a bit of attention over the past seven years for his self-portraits showing himself blending into various scenes with a carefully painted body rather than digital manipulation. His photographs have attracted the attention of Ford, which recently commissioned Liu to create a series of advertisements to promote the 2013 Ford Fusion.

Project Combines Daytime and Nighttime Shots of NYC Into Single Frames

Now here's a creative idea that we've never seen before... For this short film titled New York: Night and Day, New York City-based filmmaker and animator Philip Stockton blended daytime and nighttime images of his city into single shots. He explains,

New York: Night and Day is a combination of non-traditional video time-lapse and animation. I filmed day and night scenes from around New York City and combined them back into single sequences using rotoscoping techniques. The piece explores the relationships between night and day, by compositing together scenes shot in the same location over a time period ranging from 4 - 8 hours. I hope you enjoy it.

Layers of Light and Time Captured on Single Frames Using a 4×5 Camera

London-based photographer Tony Ellwood has a project called In No Time that deals with our perception and awareness of our passage of time. All the photographs are of the same pier on a beach that Ellwood visited over a period of six months. His technique, which took him 18 months to develop and perfect, involves visiting the location multiple times for each photo -- sometimes up to three times a day for multiple days. Using a 4x5 large format camera, Ellwood creates each exposure across multiple sessions, as if he were doing multiple exposure photography, but of a single subject and scene. Each exposure time ranges from a few seconds to multiple hours.

Portraits of Women Blended with Ink Photographs

For his surreal series titled "Beibeees", artist Alberto Seveso blended photos of women with smoke-like photographs of ink in water. To recreate this kind of look, try shooting smoke or ink against a pure white background and then use the cloudy formations as a layer mask on a portrait.