Posts Tagged ‘prints’

Get Oversized B&W Prints On the Cheap at Staples

If you’re looking for a thrifty way to have gigantic (monochrome) prints made of your photographs, look no further than your local Staples. Monica and Jess of East Coast Creative write,

Have you heard about the engineer prints from Staples? Oh.My.Goodness. They have completely changed our life for the better. Just wait, you’ll feel the same way. Take your favorite picture into Staples and ask for an oversized print (they come in multiple sizes, but the largest is 3’ by 4’. They’ll make a copy right there for you, and the best part… it costs less than $5 for a print! You’re only able to get the picture in black and white, but who cares?! It’s 5 bucks! The tricky thing is that the picture is printed on very thin paper, so you have to be careful not to bend or mark it.

They’ve written up a tutorial on how you can make a giant DIY frame for these massive prints.

Shaped Frame Family Photo [East Coast Creative]


Image credits: Photographs by Monica and Jess of East Coast Creative

Instacanvas Turns Your Instagram Photos into Sellable Wall Art

Instacanvas is a new service that helps Instagram users make money by selling their photographs as canvas wall art. Users can display their images through the “online gallery space” on the site, and sell their images to buyers as canvas prints without having to do any extra work. Instacanvas acts as the middle man, doing all the printing and shipping, and takes a 20 percent commission from sales. The prints start at $40 for a 12×12-inch canvas and go up to $80 for a 20×20-inch one. Photographers are paid via PayPal once they earn more than $100 in sales. Instagram users have bought into the idea: the service amassed over 4,000 users in the first 72 of beta testing.

Instacanvas (via Digital Trends)

Legal Rumble Over the Definition of “Limited Edition”

PDN has published an interview with art collector Jonathan Sobel, who’s suing photographer William Eggleston for creating and selling new prints of iconic photos that were once sold as “limited edition” prints. The new prints that recently fetched $5.9 million at auction were digital prints that were larger than the original ones.

The dispute boils down to this question: If an artist produces and sells a limited edition of a photographic work, and then re-issues the same image in a different size, or in a different print format or medium, does the re-issue qualify as a separate edition? Or do the new prints breach New York law that defines “limited edition,” and therefore defraud the buyers of those original limited edition versions of the work?

The answer could have a significant effect on the photographic print market. A number of photographers issue limited editions of their works, then later issue new editions of the same works, reprinted at different sizes or in different mediums. The reason is obvious: When an edition sells out, and scarcity drives up the price, artists want to cash in on pent up demand.

Sobel, who has spent 10 years studying and collecting Eggleston’s work, claims that eight of his prints that were previously worth $850,000 have been devalued by the recent sale.

Q&A: Art Collector Jonathan Sobel Explains His Beef with William Eggleston (via The Click)

Art Collector Sues William Eggleston for Selling New Prints of Iconic Photos

Last month we reported that 36 digital pigment prints of photos by William Eggleston had been auctioned off for a whopping $5.9 million. At least one man wasn’t too happy about the news: a New York-based art collector named Jonathan Sobel has filed a lawsuit against Eggleston, claiming that the photographer’s decisions to sell new, oversized prints of his iconic images has diluted the resale value of the originals. Sobel owns one of the largest private collections of Eggleston’s photographs — 192 photos worth an estimated $5 million. He is seeking unspecified damages and also a ban to prevent Eggleston from making new prints of his 1960s suburbia photos.

(via WSJ)

Living Pictures: Photo Collages of Windows Spotted Around the World

Photographer Anne-Laure House photographs illuminated windows at night in cities around the world, and arranges them into beautiful collages. She writes,

At nightfall, the windows of the flats that are lit up attract more attention than the façade of the buildings that frame them. Lit interiors become real tableaux vivants. The interior takes precedence over the exterior, and we can glimpse moments of people’s intimate lives. I am not actually interested in their intimacy as such, but rather by the space itself – the warmth of a particular light, the twinkling of a Christmas garland or the shimmering glow of a television, the corner of a painting. All these details stir my imagination and inspire my work. When I gaze at these windows, I like to tell myself a story. I capture these intimate moments and build my own structures.”

The collage above shows windows seen in New York City.
Read more…

Stop-Motion Within a Stop-Motion Using 2335 Printed Photos

Freelance videographer Dave Wallace made this creative stop-motion video for ClickPixx using 2335 printed photos. By patiently swapping the photos in and out of 10 picture frames arranged on a wall, Wallace managed to create a stop-motion video within a stop-motion video. You can also find a behind-the-scenes video here to see how it was made.

The Results of Printing 35mm Film onto Skin Using the Sun

Last week we published a post asking whether anyone had made a “print” on their skin by placing a negative on their skin under the sun. After seeing the post, videographer Jeremiah Warren decided to conduct the experiment for the benefit of all mankind. Taping four slides onto his forearm (he didn’t have any suitable negative film), Warren exposed his skin for four hours in 100-degree heat (consuming a gallon of water in the process).

Check out the video above for his results — the “prints” didn’t turn out as awesome as he had hoped. Using negative film might produce better results since slide film prints a negative image onto skin, but it doesn’t seem like sunlight is focused enough to print a sharp image onto skin.

Postagram Lets You Send Instagram Photos as Postcards

As Instagram continues its meteoric rise, an ecosystem of third-party services is developing around it. Postagram is one such service by Xobni co-founder Matt Brezina and his new company Sincerely. It lets you easy send physical prints of your Instagram photos as postcards with personalized messages. The photo itself pops out of the postcard as a glossy 300-dpi print. Postagram is available as a free download in the App Store, while each postcard costs $1 and arrives in 2-5 days.

Postagram (via TechCrunch)

Show Off Your Polaroid Love with a Heart

Here’s a fun idea for displaying your Polaroid photographs and decorating your wall: arrange the prints in the shape of a heart!


Image credit: pola heart by renée anne // and used with permission

Giving Away $100 for Printing Your Photographs on Canvas

Update: This giveaway is now over. The winner was randomly selected and can be found below.


If you’ve always wanted to make a large print of one of your photographs but never took the leap, here’s your chance: we’re giving away a $100 gift certificate to CanvasPop, a company that makes large canvas prints.

To enter this giveaway, all you need to do is:

Link to a photograph of yours that you would want printed

There are two ways to enter, and doing both methods will give you 2 entries in the contest, and thus double the chance the win!

  1. Leave your response as a comment on this post
  2. Tweet your response, and include the following link to this post anywhere in the tweet: http://j.mp/ppcanvas

    As long as the link appears in the tweet, you’ll be automatically entered in the contest.

This contest will end Monday, February 7, 2011. We’ll randomly pick a winner using random.org and update this post. Good luck!


Update: This giveaway is now over. We received 155 comment entries and 94 Tweet entries or 249 entries total. The randomly selected winner is…

#87: Alex

Would love this one on canvas….
http://www.flickr.com/photos/alex_racanelli/5183070853

Thanks for doing this…cheers

Congratulations! Please email [email protected] to claim your prize (we’re emailing you too).

Thanks to everyone who entered! Check back soon for another giveaway!


A big thanks to CanvasPop for providing the prize for this giveaway!