Posts Tagged ‘mysterious’

Leica M Mini Teased on Leica’s Website, Announcement Coming on June 11th

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The iPad mini and the Mac mini. Those are two “minified” products Apple has released to give its customers a choice for products that are cheaper and more portable. It appears Leica is planning to take a page from Apple’s playbook.

The camera company’s website has begun teasing a new Leica Mini M, a camera that will presumably be a smaller (and possibly cheaper) version of the Leica M flagship digital rangefinder.
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Canon France Facebook Photo Hints at a Mysterious New Product

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Canon France has published a mysterious teaser ad to its Facebook page that shows a woman pointing some kind of invisible camera at a couple of ping pong players. The short (translated) message states, “Soon, we will share information that will change the way you look at the world…”
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David Pogue Raves About Mysterious Camera That’s Coming in Two Weeks

New York Times gadget columnist David Pogue knows something we don’t. In this year’s list of personal electronic recommendations, he has some glowing words for a soon-to-be-announced digital camera:

I bought the amazing Canon S100, a tiny pocket camera with the biggest sensor on the market. I wrote about my reasons here. But in two weeks, I’ll be switching my allegiance. You cannot believe what’s about to come down the photographic pike. Trust me: If you’re in the market for a small camera with astonishing photographic results, hold off for a few weeks.

Could he be talking about the Canon mirrorless camera that will reportedly be announced later this month?

What Pogue Actually Bought [NYT]


Image credit: David Pogue by eschipul

The Camera: A Beautiful Short About a Mysterious Polaroid Camera

The Camera is a beautiful 7-minute-long short film by amateur filmmaker Peter Lewis about a solitary girl who finds a creepy mysterious Polaroid camera in an abandoned beach house. It’s the first film Lewis has completed, and was shot using a Canon Rebel 550D T2i (and the Canon 50mm f/1.4 and Tamron 28-200mm) on a budget of $50 during a vacation in Nags Head, North Carolina. Lewis singlehandedly managed all the stages of production, including composing the original score, creating the foley sounds, and editing the film in Final Cut Pro X. If you enjoy this film, be sure to check out Framed, an eerily similar short that was shot with an iPhone 4S.

(via DEVELOP Tube)

Canon 5D Mark III Spotted in Kenya?

Photographer Stephen Oachs over at Aperture Academy caused quite a stir yesterday after sharing some photographs he took of a Japanese photographer he spotted in Kenya. The photographer revealed that he was field testing a new Canon 200-400mm with a built-in teleconverter, but what caught Oachs attention was the camera body the man was using — a Canon DSLR that he didn’t recognize. He writes,

You can see it in the photos I took… I see the “Q” button located by the big wheel on the right, which on the 7D is currently located on the top left. The battery grip seems to have a joystick. I also noticed a “Rate” button…hrm, any ideas?

Is this the new 5D Mark III, or maybe the 7D Mark II? This info I was not able to determine.

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Photographer Identified Just Hours After NYT Shares Mysterious Nazi Album

Earlier this week the New York Times was lent a mysterious photo album that contained 214 photos of Nazi Germany, including images taken just feet away from Hitler. There was no indication of who the photographer was, so the Lens blog decided to publish some of the photos and crowdsource the task of solving the mystery.
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Singer Seal Spotted with Mysterious Leica, Possibly an Upcoming Digital MP

Last week The Daily Mail published some photographs of British singer Seal passing through LAX airport with his family. While at first glance it might look like the camera hanging around his neck is a Leica MP film rangefinder, look a little closer and you’ll see that it’s not — it doesn’t have a battery compartment, a film reverse lever, or a film advance lever…
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Mysterious and Fishy Nikon Q Photos

The above photographs were anonymously emailed to Nikon Rumors recently, and appear to show Nikon presenting some sort of upcoming “Q” camera. The fact that Nikon has begun including the text “F Mount” on their rear lens caps seems to indicate that we might see a new mount introduced soon, possibly for a new EVIL system and in time for Photokina.
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Digital Kodak Nikonos Mystery Solved

In 1998, this US Navy photo was published, showing a Nikonos camera no one recognized from the IPTC caption:

NAVAL AIR BASE CORONADO, California (June 8, 1998) — Navy SEALs attached to SEAL Team One, Naval Air Base Coronado, CA, conducts training using the Nikon/Kodak DCS 425 underwater digital camera which can sends real time digital images to decision makers, and an LPI LPD tracking device uses brevity codes to send both mission status and precise longitude/latitude. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Ted Banks. (RELEASED)

The enigmatic photo and description sparked much interest — this is a digital SLR that requires no underwater casing, and was far advanced for its time with its built-in tracking, real-time uploading, GPS, and communications. The underwater film Nikonos RS camera existed on the market already, but this futuristic iteration was unheard of in 1998.

What’s more, Kodak denied existence of the camera altogether. When Jarle Aasland of NikonWeb did some research into the matter in 2005, Kodak told him:

“I’m sorry but those cameras never existed here at Eastman Kodak. We never made cameras for that specific use. The information you have is incorrect.”

Another Kodak source told him:

“I think the issue is who they were made for.”

After further investigation into the mythical camera, Aasland finally found photos of the camera listed on eBay, hard evidence of the cameras existence. He published a story on his findings.

Days after Aasland published his article, he was contacted by Kodak’s lead engineer for the DCS cameras, Jim McGarvey. As it turns out, the camera was not quite top secret, but it was so low-profile that few knew about it, including Kodak Professional, McGarvey said. Quite simply, the specialized cameras were not advertised on a consumer level, since they were designed for government use, McGarvey wrote:

“The Nikonos body cameras were made by Kodak’s Commercial & Government Systems division. Through most of the DCS years, that group would take our commercial camera designs and adapt them for government and other special needs. Some of that work was secret, but most of the products were simply only marketed in limited venues and didn’t appear on the commer[c]ical photography radar screens. I don’t think the Nikonos cameras were ever actually secret.

…I have no idea how many Nikonos units were built, but I doubt the total would be over 100. They had no super secret special communications stuff, just standard DCS420 features.”

While it’s still highly unlikely that we’ll see such a formidable does-it-all camera on the mainstream market anytime soon, it’s pretty fascinating to see how today’s consumer products are taking a step in that direction. Some 12 years after the legendary digital Nikonos, we’ve got cameras equipped with GPS, wi-fi enabled cards for real-time uploading, and a plethora of hardy, underwater point-and-shoots on the market.

(via Nikon Rumors)