Posts Tagged ‘microscopy’

Beautiful Photographs of Microscopic Plankton that Look Like Photos of Outer Space

Faults: Coscinodiscus and pinnularia, crushed

Faults: Coscinodiscus and pinnularia, crushed

When you look at the photographs in her series Into the Umbra, photographer Julia Bennett wants you to think you’re looking at outer space. And then, just as your mind is struggling to expand to encompass the far reaches of the solar system where the image was captured, that’s when she wants you to realize that you’re looking at something you could find in any old liter of Sea Water.

Her images weren’t captured with a telescope peering into the heavens, but a microscope that peers into the micro worlds inside droplets of seawater. Read more…

Photomicrographer Captures the Stunning, Jagged Landscapes Inside Gemstones

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There is beauty in imperfection. In fact, imperfection might be considered the subject within a subject that photomicrographer Danny Sanchez tirelessly seeks out to create his stunning photography.

Sanchez’s main subjects are gemstones, but the colorful, alien ‘landscapes’ he captures are made up of imperfections called ‘inclusions’ that actually make a gem less valuable. You might say that one gem merchant’s trash is a gem photographer’s treasure. Read more…

GIF Made with Electron Microscope Zooms In On Life, On Life, On Life

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No, the title of this post wasn’t written by some sort of broken record robot. It is in fact an accurate description of the GIF below, which was created from photographs taken with a Scanning Electron Microscope. Read more…

Captivating TED Talk on the Unseen Worlds that Time-Lapse, Microscopic Imagery and Slow Motion Reveal

The intersection of Science, Technology and Art, at least according to renowned filmmaker and time-lapse photographer Louie Schwartzberg, is curiosity and wonder. And in the TED talk above, he makes the case for how few things pique that curiosity and inspire that wonder like the “hidden miracles of the natural world” that time-lapse, slow motion and microscopic imagery reveal. Read more…

Photographer Wins Big in Copyright Case, $1.6M Big

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It’s always nice when we stumble across a copyright case that doesn’t lead to wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth, rare as that might be. So when we ran across the news that a photographer pulled in $1.6 million in a copyright lawsuit, we just had to share it. Read more…

Researchers Take First-Ever Photographs of Molecules Forming Chemical Bonds

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Science nerds and photographers can join hands today and stare in awe at what a team of researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory managed to do. Entirely by accident, these scientists have managed to take the first ever high-res images of carbon atoms in the process of forming chemical bonds.
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Inside the Lab of an Electron Microscope Photographer

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David Scharf is a basement pioneer in the art of making some of the world’s smallest things appear huge.
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Photos Showing the Strange Similarities of Human Cities and Human Neurons

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In the side-by-side images above, the photo on the left shows a city as seen by astronauts on the International Space Station, and then photo on the right shows a photo of a neuron imaged with fluorescence microscopy. One is massive and seen from a grand scale, while the other is microscopic and cannot be seen by the human eye, yet they look strangely similar in their structure.

Infinity Imagined has a gallery of these comparisons of cities and neurons, showing the strange and striking similarities between the two.
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Scientists Shoot a 281-Gigapixel Photo of a Tiny 1.5mm Embryo

Gigapixel images are usually used to capture tiny details in expansive scenes, but scientists in the Netherlands recently created one that shows microscopic details in a tiny subject. Using a technique called virtual nanoscopy (a new relative of microscopy?), the researchers created a massive 281-gigapixel image of a 1.5-millimeter-long zebrafish embryo.
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Seeing Beyond the Human Eye

“Science can be beautiful. Art can be scientific.” This latest episode of the PBS series Off Book, titled “Seeing Beyond the Human Eye“, looks into how science and photographic techniques are helping transform how we see the world.

Technology defies the boundaries of human perception. From photomicrography to astrophotography, size and distance are no longer barriers, and through slow-mo and timelapse, we are allowed to see time and humanity in a new light. Through our curiosity and thirst for the unknown, the beauty of the universe can now be explored beyond the limits of the naked eye.