Posts Tagged ‘art’

Rumor: Sigma’s Much Anticipated 24mm f/1.4 Art Lens May Finally Arrive in Early 2015

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Sigma has been cranking out its Art, Sports and Contemporary lens lineups like mad this past year. Of those three, the Art series has been the most talked about, and it looks like the much-anticipated 24mm f/1.4 addition to that line might finally see the light of day in Q1 of 2015.

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Swift Galleries Lets Clients See Your Prints on Their Walls, Pick an Arrangement, and Place an Order

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Swift Galleries is an upcoming platform whose goal is to get your photography work on your clients’ walls and, in turn, bring in some extra profit for you.

By leveraging a simple drag-and-drop web app, Swift Galleries makes it easy for you to customize and show off how your photographs would look in your clients’ homes, with little to no effort on your behalf.

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The Guardian: Photos Don’t Belong in Art Galleries

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Does photography deserve a place in art galleries? Jonathan Jones doesn’t think so. The Guardian art columnist has caused quite a stir after writing a piece titled, “Flat, soulless and stupid: why photographs don’t work in art galleries.”

While Jones acknowledges that photographs can be “powerful, beautiful, and capture the immediacy of a moment like nothing else,” he argues that they are, “poor art when hung on a wall like paintings.”
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Video: The Life and Work of Iconic Photographer Robert Doisneau

Ted Forbes of The Art of Photography is back at it again, taking an in-depth look at the life and work of another inspirational and iconic figure in the world of photography. This time, the subject is French photographer Robert Doisneau. Read more…

Colorful Abstract Macro Photographs Created by Injecting Watercolors Into Ferrofluid On a Magnet

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Artist Fabian Oefner‘s project Millefiori is, like most of the projects we’ve ever shared by him, a mixture of science and art. By combining vibrant watercolors with a magnetic solution called ferrofluid, he was able to create these gorgeous macro photographs of the paint and ferrofluid interacting on top of a magnet. Read more…

This Bizarre Jacket is Covered with Cameras to Repel and Photograph Attackers

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The “Aposematic Jacket” is not your average piece of men’s apparel. For one thing, it’s covered with camera lenses, front and back. The garment is designed to protect you on the streets by repelling would-be attackers and helping you photograph them if they get too close for comfort.
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Intricately Detailed Concrete Recreations of Iconic Film Cameras

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Artist Alex Stanton has a thing for photography, but he doesn’t actually take any pictures. His obsession with photography is focused on the vintage gear so many of us adore; gear he’s decided to preserve in extreme detail using a mix of concrete, bronze, copper, brass, patina, rust, iron, epoxy. Read more…

Digital Artist Uses Photoshop to Bring His Childhood Drawings Into the Real World

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Twenty years ago, at the tender age of 4, Netherlands-based artist Telmo Pieper wasn’t quite as skilled at his craft as he is now. And so, in his series Kiddie Arts, he decided to revisit some of his ‘early work’ and bring it up to speed using his prodigious Photoshop skills. Read more…

Dermatographia: Artist Turns Her Rare Skin Condition Into an Artistic Medium

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Brooklyn-based artist Ariana Page Russell takes the saying “being comfortable in your own skin” to an artful and literal degree.

Born with dermatographic urticaria, Russell takes advantage of this condition also known as “skin writing” to turn herself into a living, breathing work of art, photographing her sometimes beautiful, sometimes intricate, and sometimes itchy designs for a series titled Dermatographia. Read more…

Artist Creates Incredible ‘Melting’ Sculpture Illusion Using Strobes and Still Images

What you see in the video above is a real sculpture that does, in fact, look as if it is perpetually melting right before your eyes. But while creating the exact sculpture took months of design and engineering work, the photographic technique behind it was invented as long ago as 100 BC.

What you’re looking at is a three-dimensional “zoetrope,” an animation device that created the illusion of motion using lighting effects or a sequence of still images (in this case, it’s a mix of clever sculpting and well-timed strobes). Read more…