Posts Published in May 2011

Interview with Oleg Gutsol of 500px

Oleg Gutsol is the co-founder and technical director of photo-sharing service 500px.


PetaPixel: Can you tell me a little about yourself and your background?

Oleg Gutsol: Ian and I met during our university years at Ryerson, around 2004. He was in business and finance program and I was in computer science. We both liked photography, travel and motorcycles, so there were some common points of interest. I think we both shared a passion for working on something meaningful, and although then we were not working together, we both were exploring opportunities to start our own business.
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1923 Leica Sells for $1.9 Million, Becomes World’s Most Expensive Camera

A Leica 0-series camera made in 1923 was sold this past weekend at WestLicht Photographica Auctions for a staggering €1.32 million (~$1.89 million). Only about 25 0-series cameras were manufactured to test the market before Leica began commercially producing the Leica A. It’s the most expensive camera ever sold, but is still only half the price of the most expensive photo that was auctioned earlier this month.
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Photos with People Are Most Memorable, Landscapes Are Least

A group of neuroscientists at MIT recently conducted a study to try and determine what makes photographs memorable. After gathering about 10,000 diverse photos, they showed a series of them to human subjects and asked them to identify whenever a photo was a repeat of one previously shown. They found that photos containing people in them are the most memorable, while natural landscapes are least memorable and easily forgotten.

What’s more, the scientists used the findings to develop a computer algorithm that can quantify how memorable a particular photo is. Cameras in the future might be able to tell you the memorability of photos as you’re taking them!

(via PhysOrg via Photoxels)


Image credits: Photographs by the Oliva and Torralba labs

Night Sky Time-Lapse with Fixed Stars and Spinning Earth

Time-lapse videos of the night sky usually feature breathtaking views of stars spinning in the background, but here’s a night sky time-lapse that offers a different perspective — instead of having the stars rotate overhead, the sky is fixed while the foreground spins around the frame. The original (and traditional) footage can be found here.

(via Reddit)

Black Frame Film for Polaroid Cameras

Not content with simply resurrecting traditional Polaroid instant film, The Impossible Project is also selling a special Black Frame version of its PX 600 Silver Shade film. The black borders give the instant film a pretty unique look, but packs of Black Frame film are pretty pricey: 8 exposures will cost you $24.

PX 600 Silver Shade UV+ Black Frame (via Photojojo)

Animation Showing How the Canon 10D and 24-85mm Lens are Assembled

This animation was created by students of the Engineering 128: Advanced Engineering Design Graphics course at UC Berkeley during the Spring 2008 semester. The first part shows a Canon 10D DSLR exploding into its individual parts, and then those parts coming together again to slowly rebuild the camera, while the second part does the same for a Canon 24-85mm lens. Pretty dang impressive considering that it’s for an undergraduate course.

Photo Tools App for Android Phones

It seems every time we feature a fun or useful phone app, it’s for the iPhone. If you’re an Android user (there’s more and more of you out there), here’s one for you: Photo Tools is a free app that offers a pretty large number of useful photography tools bundled into a single application. In it you’ll find everything from a digital gray card to a sunset/sunrise calculator.

Photo Tools (via Reddit)

The Government’s War on Cameras

Libertarian magazine Reason created this video about the erosion of photographers’ rights in the United States. One of the cases highlighted is the one involving Antonio Musumeci, who was arrested for filming a government building and came out victorious in a lawsuit with the help of the NYCLU.

(via Reason.tv)

Wedding Rings Based on the Leica 50mm Summilux Lens

When two photographers got engaged in Japan, they asked their jewelry-maker friend to create wedding rings based on the Leica 50mm Summilux lens. The groom’s ring was the focusing ring while the bride’s was the aperture ring. The friend also created a stunningly realistic miniature Leica M3 to hold the rings (they slide onto the lens)!

(via Tokyo Camera Style)


Update: Here are some new photos of the rings:

This one shows the scale of the mini M3 next to actual Leica cameras:

Business Card with Nifty Built-in Aperture Mechanism

Bryce Bell of cardnetics created this business card design that features a built-in aperture mechanism. Pull the lever down and the aperture opens up. If you run a photography-related business, this could be a neat business card to pass out to your clients. Pre-assembled cards start at $6 each, while you can buy kits that you put together yourself for $2.50. If you want to try printing and laser cutting the card yourself, the design templates are available here.

Small Iris (via Reddit)