landscapephotography

Landscape op-ed: Has landscape photography lost its way?

No, Landscape Photography Has Not ‘Gone Off the Deep End’

Next to portraiture, landscape photography is among the oldest genres. It has gone through evolutions, and thanks to pioneers like Ansel Adams, landscape photography even helped bring photography into the larger art discussion. But after more than a century of influence and brilliance, has landscape photography lost its way?

How to Take Great Landscape Photos Close to Home

In my dream I’m standing on the rim of a deep, verdant canyon. Far below, a river glinting crimson and gold in the setting sun snakes toward jagged mountains dusted with snow. My camera’s viewfinder perfectly frames this epic vista in the wilds of northern New Mexico.

Why Your Wide-Angle Lens Images Are So Boring

A common challenge for photographers using wide-angle lenses is creating depth in their images. The shots may seem flat and dull if they do not have a distinct point of interest and a clear visual path that draws the viewer’s eye into the scene.

Photographing Idaho’s Picturesque Sawtooth Mountains with Matt Suess

With each passing year, more photographers find themselves exploring the endless miles of pristine rivers, remote backroads, and stunning landscapes of Idaho. Even with the influx of tourism, Idaho still has plenty of solitude for those who seek it. OM SYSTEM Ambassador and photographer Matt Suess recently traveled to the state's Sawtooth Mountains in search of portfolio-worthy images and a distraction from an unexpected change in his personal life.

How to Photograph Sand Dunes

How to Photograph Sand Dunes

It’s never a bad day to capture landscape photography on the dunes. This day, in particular though, was truly one to remember and I share a variety of techniques for how I take photos of sand dunes.

Michael Shainblum noise reduction for landscape photography

The Best Noise Reduction Software for Landscape Photographers

Landscape photographer Michael Shainblum's latest video takes a very close look at noise reduction software, specifically when using noise reduction on landscape images. Shainblum published an article on his website that includes sample images and crops, which are more beneficial than viewing comparisons in the YouTube video featured below.

Michael Shainblum Photo

Calming the Chaos: How to Photograph Overwhelming Landscape Locations

The American Southwest is an enchanting realm brimming with extraordinary shapes, mesmerizing textures, and captivating patterns. Amidst a symphony of vibrant colors and diverse textures, capturing the essence of such a place can initially feel overwhelming.

Michael Shainblum Landscape

How To Properly Scout Locations To Get Gorgeous Landscape Photos

When I first started doing landscape photography, visiting new locations used to intimidate me a lot. I think part of me would feel the anxiety and pressure of needing to get a good shot, and oftentimes, I would not use the proper tools to set myself up for success.

Why I Spent 30 Days Photographing the Same Beach

Most of the time in landscape photography, we plan to visit several incredible destinations and photograph them over the course of a week-long trip, typically capturing seven or eight different places.

Michael Shainblum

6 Tips To Help You Capture Unique Abstract Landscape Photography

Abstract landscape photography offers a unique opportunity to explore the world around us in a completely different way. By focusing on patterns, shapes, and textures, we can discover unseen worlds in even the most mundane places.

michael shainblum photo

5 Tips for Capturing Breathtaking Woodland Photography

Capturing images in the woods can be a fulfilling experience, and I have fond memories of wandering through the forest with my camera in hand. However, finding a good composition can be a challenge and sometimes stressful.

Shooting the Landscape at 70 Miles an Hour

Landscape photography at 70 mph. Is it even possible? For years the idea of landscape photography was to put your camera on a tripod, frame very carefully, then wait for the light to be perfect before you shot. But what if you had to do everything in exactly the opposite way?