glasses

Why Not Wear a Camera on Your Face?

Think about it for a minute: if you’re willing to hold a camera to your eye, why not have a camera attached to it that can snap away, by voice instruction, instead of finger on the shutter?

How to ‘Magically’ Remove Glare from Glasses in Photoshop

Unmesh Dinda over at PIXimperfect has released another exceptional photo editing tutorial that you'll want to bookmark if you shoot portraits. In this video, he shows you a detailed step-by-step method for removing glare from glasses in Photoshop—something all of us have probably had to do at one point or another.

Snapchat Unveils Spectacles 2.0: You Can Shoot Photos Now

Snapchat's Spectacles camera glasses generated a huge amount of hype when they were slowly released in 2016, but total sales were reportedly disappointing. But that isn't stopping the company from doubling down on the project: it just announced Spectacles 2.0 with design improvements and the ability to shoot still photos.

You Can Now Buy Snapchat Spectacles Directly on Amazon

Snap Inc’s experimental foray into wearables may not have had much of a financial impact for the struggling company, but they did create some buzz with their pop-up ‘Snapbot’ vending machines. Now they’ve made their Spectacles available directly on Amazon at the same $130 price.

How I Finally Bought a Pair of Snapchat Spectacles for $130

In September 2016, Snapchat changed it’s name to Snap Inc. and introduced Spectacles, a pair of sunglasses with a built-in camera that records 10-second snippets of video and posts directly to your Snapchat Story.

Glasses LED 1

These Privacy Glasses Use Infrared Light to Hide Your Face from Cameras

In this day and age, you're likely to have a hard time walking down the street and not seeing a camera somewhere. If it isn't held by the shutter-happy tourist in short shorts, it's the CCTV camera mounted at the entrance of the local subway station.

How does one maintain anonymity? Staying in? No! You put on fabulous privacy-protecting glasses under development by Japan's National Institute of Informatics.

Anti-Photography Glasses Prevent Facial Recognition from Doing Its Thing

Professor Isao Echizen from Tokyo's National Institute of Informatics seems to think that photography and facial tagging are infringing a bit too eagerly on your privacy. So, in a bid to avoid being surveyed (perhaps by the all-seeing eye of the ARGUS-IS) he's designed a pair of anti-photography glasses.

Vuzix to Compete with Google in Glasses-Style Camera Market

A new challenger has emerged to face Google Glass in the head-mounted glasses-style camera market. Interactive eyewear company Vuzix unveiled a new product today called the Smart Glasses M100, a camera-equipped Android computer that looks like a cross between a Bluetooth headset that's too long and a microphone that's worn too high.

Google Glass Camera Glasses Used by Runway Models as a Fashion Accessory

If Google's vision of the future of photography comes to pass, we'll soon find ourselves in a world in which camera glasses are worn around as an everyday fashion accessory. Perhaps in an effort to make this idea easier to stomach, Google partnered up with luxury fashion company Diane von Fürstenberg (DVF) today for the label's Spring 2013 fashion show, equipping people on and around the runway with its high-tech glasses. Glass wearers included runway models, Google founder Sergey Brin, and designer Diane von Furstenberg herself.

Google Shows Off Camera Glasses and More Sample Photos at Conference

Google Glass team member Max Braun took to the stage at the Google+ Photography Conference yesterday to show off a prototype device, talk about the project's potential impact in photography, and show off some new sample photographs. He states,

We see glass as an evolution of cell phone photography. It's the next step of the camera that's always with you. It's not meant to replace your professional camera anytime soon [...] We think that photography in Glass is going to open up a whole range of pictures that would not have been possible otherwise.

The Google Glass portion of the talk begins at the 47 minute mark in the video above.