Posts Tagged ‘links’

How to Find Out if Someone Views the Photo Links You Send

If you regularly send emails containing links to your photographs, perhaps you’ve wondered whether the recipients actually viewed your images like they say they did. Was It Viewed? is a website that helps you easily make your links trackable. Simply provide the link and your email address for notification purposes, and the app will generate a special link you can send out. Whenever the link is clicked, you’ll receive an email notification informing you of the fact (along with some details about the clicker). For added stealthiness, the app can also package your link inside a bit.ly shortened link to hide the fact that it’s tracked.

Was It Viewed? (via Lifehacker)

Celebrating Film Photography: “Camera Style” Websites Worldwide

tokyo camera style by John Sypal (see our interview with him) is a popular website documenting the analog camera culture in Tokyo, Japan by sharing photographs of cameras being used on the streets — it’s like The Sartorialist except for cameras instead of fashion. If you’re a fan of the site and love browsing photos of old school cameras people use, you’ll be happy to know that there’s a number of similar websites for other cities and places around the world.
Read more…

How to Make Your Own Cinemagraphs

Photographer Jamie Beck has done quite a bit lately to popularize the “cinemagraph“: Harry Potter-esque photos that are given an extra dimension by adding a dash of animation. If you want to learn how to make your own, Photojojo recently published a great tutorial on how to make them using Photoshop. Photographers Fernando Baez and Christopher Mathew Burt have also published tutorials and some helpful tips.


Image credit: Photograph by Jamie Beck

The Story Behind the Polaroid SX-70

Harry McCracken over at Technologizer wrote a fascinating piece about Polaroid founder Edwin Land and the history of the SX-70 camera.

“Don’t undertake a project,” an oft-quoted Land maxim goes, “unless it is manifestly important and nearly impossible.” The SX-70 was both.

Did you know that “SX-70″ was actually the codeword used by Land a quarter century before the SX-70 camera for his first instant film camera project? It was his 70th Special eXperiment (Land was a Harvard dropout and prolific inventor, inventing the first synthetic material capable of polarizing light when he was just 19-years-old!)

It’s a pretty lengthy piece, but a must-read for any Polaroid lover.

Polaroid’s SX-70: The Art and Science of the Nearly Impossible (via Daring Fireball)


Image credit: SX-70 Family by Brian Warren

How to Build Your Own Tilt-Shift Lens for Just $10

Tilt-shift lenses are usually pretty pricey, so many people fake the effect during post-processing by selectively blurring sections of their photographs. There’s even simple web-apps that can add such blur to give your photographs a miniature scale model effect.

If faking the effect isn’t legit enough to satisfy your photo-geekiness — and you’d rather not drop big bucks on it either — there’s a nifty do-it-yourself solution you need to check out: Bhautik Joshi over at cow.mooh.org has a new DIY Tilt-Shift project that teaches you how to convert an old lens into various kinds of tilt-shift lenses.
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2010 Webby Award Nominees for Best Use of Photography

This year’s nominees have just been announced for the 14th annual Webby Awards, and one of the nearly 70 categories is “Best Use of Photography“.

These are websites that showcase photography rather than websites about photography. The Webby Awards don’t have an award for that (yet).

Here are the five nominees this year:

It’s interesting to note that all of the nominees are flash-based websites that use dark gray or black backgrounds.

Calculate Your Local Golden Hour

The golden hour in photography is the first or last hour of sunlight in a day that photographers often aim to shoot in, since the sun’s position produces a soft and warm light with longer shadows. The Golden Hour Calculator is a useful website that can help you calculate the golden hour(s) for your location, telling you exactly when the sun rises and sets.

The Golden Hour Calculator (via Reddit)


Update: Darkness is an app for the iPhone that can help you calculate your golden hours on the go. (thx @noahaboussafy)

MIT Photography Courses Online

Update: It looks like many of these courses are no longer available.


In a well known scene from Good Will Hunting, the main character Will drops the following gem as he defends his uneducated friend against a cocky Harvard student: “[...] you dropped a hundred and fifty grand on a f**kin’ education you coulda’ got for a dollar fifty in late charges at the Public Library.”

If you’re looking for some education in photography, another school in Cambridge, MIT, is offering the material of quite a few photography classes for free online. This includes everything from reading lists and assignments to full downloads of course materials and student projects. Here’s a quick list:

4.341 Introduction to Photography

This course also offers practical instruction in basic black and white techniques, digital imaging, fundamentals of camera operation, lighting, film exposure, development and printing. Course provides opportunity for continued exploration.

4.341 Introduction to Photography and Related Media

This course provides practical instruction in the fundamentals of analog and digital SLR and medium/large format camera operation, film exposure and development, black and white darkroom techniques, digital imaging, and studio lighting.

4.343 Photography and Related Media

Fosters a critical awareness of how images in our culture are produced and constructed. Student-initiated term project at the core of exploration. Special consideration given to the relationship of space and the photographic image. Practical instruction in basic black and white techniques, digital imaging, fundamentals of camera operation, lighting, film exposure, development, and printing.

4.A21 Stories Without Words: Photographing the First Year

The transition from high school and home to college and a new living environment can be a fascinating and interesting time, made all the more challenging and interesting by being at MIT. More than recording the first semester through a series of snapshots, this freshman seminar will attempt to teach photography as a method of seeing and a tool for better understanding new surroundings.

11.309J / 4.215J Sensing Place: Photography as Inquiry

This course explores photography as a disciplined way of seeing, of investigating landscapes and expressing ideas. Readings, observations, and photographs form the basis of discussions on landscape, light, significant detail, place, poetics, narrative, and how photography can inform design and planning, among other issues.

21A.348 Photography and Truth

Photographs in anthropology serve many purposes: as primary data, illustrations of words in a book, documentation for disappearing cultures, evidence of fieldwork, material objects for museum exhibitions, and even works of art. This course explores photography as art, research tool, and communication.

Have other links to free online courses? Feel free to share with us in the comments!

(via Your Photo Tips)


Image credit: The Dome at MIT by opencontent