Articles Written by Adam Griffith

Cameras Don’t Break Rules, People Break Rules

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A portrait session that results in the death of the subject should be called a failure.

As reported by the Salt Lake Tribune, a group of photographers and onlookers experienced precisely that level of catastrophic botchery last week in Grand Teton National Park when crowding too close to a moose (not a good idea).

The moose, already agitated by the presence of a nearby bull moose, was scared by the approaching park-visitors and bolted before stumbling over a picnic table and landing on a fire grate. With its hoof caught in the grate, the half-ton animal collapsed and broke its leg so badly that park rangers were forced to put it down. Read more…

Please Don’t Be the One to Get Drones Banned

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Photography drones are facing a perilous atmosphere of distrust and legal chaos. In these circumstances, even small mistakes can have big consequences. A shift in public sentiment against private drone usage could easily result in the application of restrictive regulations, or perhaps even conditional bans. Read more…

Why Polaroid’s Cube Action Cam is Special

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Shopping for an action camera is like shopping for adhesive bandages: you either buy Band-Aids … or you pick up something  called “Aid Plus Bandages” because they’re on sale. And when you bring them home, you just call them Band-Aids anyway. Read more…

Why Lomography Loves Kickstarter

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Last week, Lomography announced their first instant film camera: the Lomo’Instant (a quirky name to match a quirky camera). And rather than outright launching the product, or even just announcing a shipping date, they chose to introduce the new camera through a Kickstarter campaign.

This isn’t Lomography’s first attempt at crowdfunding. They did the same thing when launching their Petzval Lens and their Smartphone Film Scanner last year. Given the trend, we’re likely to see more of their future launches taking the form of Kickstarter campaigns as well. But why? Read more…

Alpha Dog: How Sony Created the Most Innovative Camera Brand in Under a Decade

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Using the bones of a dying giant and a healthy dose of innovation, Sony built one of the most forward thinking lines of high-end cameras available in recent memory.

When they entered the serious photography market following their acquisition of the struggling Konica Minolta camera business, Sony brought the coffers and clout of an international conglomerate as well as the fresh eyes of a newcomer. Using those tools, they’ve pushed the technological envelope in a way that few others were willing or capable of doing and, now, are setting the benchmark for where others ought to be aiming. Oh, and they did it all in just eight years. Read more…

Dude, Who Took My Photograph? Curating Automated Photography

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A slew of new technologies are making it possible (even easy) to document everything around you without much effort or input. Wearable, automated cameras represent the most extreme end of this spectrum – devices like Autographer and the Narrative Clip record your daily life with a mind of their own. Read more…

Should Photographers Care About 4K?

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If you had to summarize this year’s NAB Show in Las Vegas in one word, it would probably be “4K.”

The NAB (Which stands for National Association of Broadcasters) Show is the world’s largest Electronic Media show, and deals largely in video. But, this year, at least one of the announcements had interesting implications for the still photography market. Read more…

Should Photographers Accept Bitcoin as Payment?

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Enthusiasts of bitcoin, the electronic cryptocurrency, have more ways than ever to spend their digital cash. But should professional photographers try to take advantage of the growing popularity of bitcoin and similar systems by accepting it as payment for their work?

A few photographers say so, but first, what is bitcoin and how does it work? Read more…

Future of the Photo Store: Two Successful Brick-and-Mortar Store Owners Weigh In

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New photographers today can buy their first camera, take lessons on how to use it, research photography destinations, order prints and books of their work, and start selling it without ever setting foot in a brick-and-mortar camera store or printing business. It’s hard to imagine how any photo store with an actual sales floor can still survive.

Some definitely aren’t. It’s been more than a year since Ritz and Wolf Camera, one of the larger names in the sector, sold off its remaining physical stores to an asset liquidation firm. Standalone establishments have struggled to hold on as well, and towns from New Jersey to California have witnessed the closing of their local photo shops. That’s a good thing if you like liquidation sales. Otherwise, not so much.

But still some persist, and even flourish, despite tough conditions. In order to understand better how photo shops are competing in today’s turbulent photography market, I spoke with the owners of two different establishments. Read more…

The X-Factor: How the Fujifilm X-Series Changed a Company and an Industry

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There’s a good chance you’re sick of reading about Fujifilm this week. But with the fever-pitch buzz surrounding the release of the X-T1, it’s not often that we consider the business behind these popular cameras.

Let’s take a moment to reflect on the unique history of the Fujifilm X-Series, and the ways in which it reinvigorated both the company that created it and the camera industry as a whole. Read more…