PetaPixel

BTS: Creating Psychedelic ‘Water Wigs’ With Tim Tadder

LA-based photographer Tim Tadder says that his images are his “voice,” and that he “never want[s] to be an echo.” Thus far, he’s doing pretty well. Last year we featured three of Tadder’s strange series: Fish Heads, Water Wigs and Water Wigs Women. And now, we have a behind the scenes video that shows how Tadder captured the stylish liquid hair portraits in the last of those.

Taking a look at the shapes of the “hair” in the resulting photos, it’s pretty easy to figure out how the pics are taken. Tadder’s assistants carefully place or drop differently shaped water balloons onto the models’ heads as he attempts to capture the ideal water wig shot.

Capturing the photos at the perfect time and freezing the action properly, however, is far from easy. His technique requires that the studio be completely dark (even a small flashlight can cause problems) and as much as we’re sure his models enjoyed having balloons thrown hard at their heads, Tadder eventually decided to start taping thumbtacks to their bald heads or bald caps to facilitate the perfect pop.

Each pop is unpredictable, and more often than not leads to an un-usable shot, but when he gets it right, the results are pretty darn cool:

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To see more of Tadder’s psychedelic water wigs, or see the fun and painstaking process behind creating them, check out the BTS video at the top or visit his website by clicking here.


Image credits: Photographs by Tim Tadder


 
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  • Rabi Abonour

    Incredibly fun set. A lot of effort, but clearly worth it.

  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    I wonder why he needed the set to be completely dark. Couldn’t the studio strobes just overpower the ambient light?

  • http://www.facebook.com/MugiwaraKaizokudan Bruck Assefa

    Studio strobes usually flash for a longer duration than speed lights do to get their high intensity. At full power the duration was probably too long to adequately stop the motion of the water. He probably had the strobes at a very low power to keep the flash duration very short and at that power ambient would probably interfere.

  • http://www.observingtime.com/ agour

    Thanks for clearing that up, it’s appreciated :)