Posts Published in May 2012

Chinese Commuters Floating on Invisible Bicycles

Floating is a series of manipulated photographs by Chinese photographer Zhao Huasen showing people in China riding around on invisible bicycles.
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Nat Geo on Photo Filters: “Please Stop”

For those of you who’ve ever wondered what it takes to get your work into National Geographic, here’s a hint: not “creative” software filters. According to a set of guidelines laid out in a message from the magazine’s Director of Photography, certain minor post-processing is ok with the exception of filters. Minimal dodging and burning, black and white, hand tinted images (if you’re experienced), and cropping are ok when done well; fish eye lenses are discouraged; but filters are a definite no no.

How much of a no no? Well, the photo director’s exact words regarding filters boil down to: “No. Please stop.” So even though the current trend in photography, spearheaded by Instagram, is towards filters, don’t expect Nat Geo to jump on the bandwagon anytime soon.

A message from the Director of Photography of National Geographic (via Reddit)

Fujifilm Considered Acquiring Leica and Olympus

In a recent interview with Fujifilm CEO Shigetaka Komori, German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine dived into some pretty intense financial conversation. Much of what was said didn’t pertain directly to photography — discussions about Fuji’s involvement in the medical field and cosmetics for instance — but certain parts of the interview were very interesting indeed. Read more…

The Making of an Epic Solar Eclipse Photo

Of the photographs that emerged after the recent solar eclipse on May 20th, there aren’t many that are more epic than the “Ring of Fire” photo captured by Michael Chow of The Arizona Republic. In an interview with Dallas News, Chow reveals that the photograph was birthed rather spontaneously. Shooting the eclipse in Phoenix’s Papago Park — a hiking area he knows well — Chow noticed a group of people standing on a butte a quarter mile away. He parked his car, ran across some desert, and snapped the photograph using a Canon 1D Mark IV and 400mm lens at 1/6400 — all while doing his best to avoid looking at the sun directly.

Behind the Ring of Fire (via Coudal)


Image credit: Photograph by Michael Chow and used with permission

200 Yards: A Photo Project Documenting SF Through a Hyperlocal Lens

200 Yards is a neat photo project based in San Francisco that centers around the idea of having photographers point cameras at a small section of a particular city. For each cycle, organizers pick a particular “alternative gallery space” and invite photographers to create photographs within a 200-yard radius of that location (this translates to roughly one block in each direction). Submissions are then whittled down until 12 photographers remain, and these artists are invited to the resulting exhibition at the gallery space.

200 Yards (via Photojojo)

Nikon Releases a Firmware Update to Fix the D4 and D800 Lock Up Issue

In early March, Nikon offered a temporary fix to a lock up issue that had been plaguing the D4 and D800. At the time you had to turn off the ‘Highlights’ and ‘RGB Histogram’ display options to avoid the issue, but Nikon promised a more permanent fix was in the works. Good news, the fix is finally here in the form of Firmware Update B:1.01.

Besides fixing the lock up issue, the new update also offers solutions to a few other bugs including unexpected changes to aperture and exposure compensation when using certain custom settings and RAW files not being network transferrable when in JPEG only mode. More details including the firmware downloads for the D800 and D4 are ready for your downloading pleasure here and here, respectively.

(via Nikon via Engadget)


Image credit: Nikon D4_ambience_3 by louisvolant

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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New Nikon Patent Points to Possibility of a Future f/0.7 Mirrorless Lens

Apertures can get pretty big, but a new patent from Nikon seems to imply that a future Nikon 1 mirrorless lens could weigh in at f/0.7. The patent, which gives an example of a 32mm f/1.2 (pictured above), clearly states that the new technology could successfully yield smaller numbers due to optimization of the aperture diameter, flange back length and image circle. Read more…

Mind-Bending Mirror Scene from the Movie “Sucker Punch”

If you liked the the “impossible shot” from the film Contact that we shared earlier this week, you’ll enjoy this clip as well. It’s a shot from the film Sucker Punch that uses some clever camera work and trickery rather than CGI to create its mind-bending effect. Interestingly enough, both this clip and the Contact one feature actress Jena Malone (albeit at different ages).


Thanks for the tips PupaChrysalis and traeger23!

Olympus to Settle with ex-CEO, Avoid Massive Lawsuit Over Unfair Dismissal

Just yesterday news broke that Michael Woodford — the former Olympus CEO who blew the whistle on the now-infamous scandal and was subsequently fired — would be suing his former employer over unfair dismissal for a whopping $60 million dollars. And today, in an altogether not unexpected turn of events, Olympus is said to be preparing to settle out of court for a smaller (yet still massive) amount of money — “only” $15.5 million.

The settlement is still pending approval from the new board, but all evidence points to a positive outcome for Woodford, who over the last several months has been hailed as everything from whistleblower to “boldest business person of the year.” After this settlement we could probably also add “significantly rich[er]” to that list.

(via Engadget)


Image credit: Money by 401K

Hasselblad vs Red Epic: Will Video Kill the Still Photography Star?

Video technology is advancing at an alarming rate, and the question that seems to be on many a photographer’s mind is: “will video ever render still photography obsolete?” In the future, will shooting a sunset simply involve going out and recording 30 minutes to an hour of video and then pulling your favorite frames into Photoshop or Lightroom? Well, that’s the question that this video from Fstoppers is trying to answer.
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